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FAMILY MISCELLANY

AND

Monthly Srhool-Render.

DEVOTED TO

THE

PHYSICAL, MORAL, AND INTELLECTUAL IMPROVEMENT OF YOUTH ; EMBRACING
THE NATURAL SCIENCES, NATURAL HISTORY, BIOGRAPHY,

HISTORY, AND MUSIC.

N. A. CALKINS, EDITOR

VOLUMES III. AND IV.:

NEW YORK:
FOWLERS & WELLS, PUBLISHERS,

CLINTON HALL, 131 NASS AU STREET.

1851.

R

THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

58522A

ASTOR. LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS
R

1922 L

"What is man
If his chief good and market of his-time
Be but to sleep and feed ?--A beast, no more.
Sure, He that made us with such large discourse,
Looking before and after, gave us not
That capability and godlike reason
To rust in us unused."-SAAKSPEARB.

Every wise parent, every wise community, desiring the prosperity even in the most worldly sense, of its children, will spare no pains in giving them a generous education.-HORACE MANN.

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A FAMILY MISCELLANY, AND MONTHLY SCHOOL-READER.

KNOWLEDGE WITHIN THE REACH OF ALL,*

BY HON. EDWARD EVERETT.

T point

of attainment in science and

er

HE world has advanced to a high There is no way by which knowledge

can be handed down, but by being learned art. The progress of invention and over again ; and of all the science, art, and improvement has been, especially of late skill, in the world, so much only will suryears, prodigiously rapid ; and now, wheth- vive, when those who possess it are gone,

we regard the science of nature or as shall be acquired by the succeeding of art, of mind or of morals, of contem- generation. All the rest must perish. The plation or of practice, it must be confessed rising generation is now called upon to that we live in a wonderfully improved take up this mighty weight, to carry it period.

along a little way, and then hand it over, Where is all this knowledge? Where in turn, to their successors. does it dwell? In the minds of the

pres

The minds which, in their maturity, are ent generation of men. It is, indeed, to be the depositories of all this knowledge, recorded in books, or embodied in the are coming into existence every day and various works and structures of man. But every hour, in every rank and station of these are only manifestations of knowledge. life ; all endowed with faculties; all, at The books are nothing till they are read the commencement, equally destitute of and understood; and then they are only a ideas; all starting with the ignorance and sort of shorthand, an outline, which the helplessness of nature; all invited to run mind fills up. The thing itself, the science, the noble race of improvement. In the the art, the skill, are in the minds of living cradle there is as little distinction of permen—of that generation which is now upon son as in the grave. the stage. That generation will die and The great lesson which I would teach pass away. In thirty years, all now living you is, that it depends mainly on each inwill be gone, or retired from the scene, and dividual, what part he will bear in the aca new generation will have succeeded. complishment of this great work. It is to

This mighty process does not take place be done by somebody. In a quiet order at once, either throughout the world, or in of things, the stock of useful knowledge is any part of it; but it is constantly going not only preserved, but augmented ; and on, silently, effectually, inevitably; and all each generation improves on that which the knowledge, art, and refinement, now went before. in existence, must be either acquired by It is true, there have been periods in those who are coming on the stage, or it the history of the world, when tyranny at perishes with those who are going off, and home, or invasion from abroad, has so is lost forever.

blighted and blasted the condition of so

ciety, that knowledge has perished with * Extract from the introductory address of the “ Franklin Lectores," delivered in Boston.

one generation faster than it could be VOI, III.--NO. I.-MAY, 1851.

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