The Poetical Works of the Rev. George Crabbe: With His Letters and Journals, and His Life, Volume 2

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J. Murray, 1834
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Page 35 - For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.
Page 35 - And yet, on the other hand, unless wariness be used, as good almost kill a man as kill a good book : who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image , but he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself, kills the image of God, as it were in the eye.
Page 42 - And God saw their works, that they turned from their evil way; and God repented of the evil that he had said that he would do unto them; and he did it not.
Page 37 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Page 11 - Sir Joshua Reynolds was, on very many accounts, one of the most memorable men of his time. He was the first Englishman who added the praise of the elegant arts to the other glories of his country. In taste, in grace, in facility, in happy invention, and in the richness and harmony of colouring, he was equal to the great masters of the renowned ages.
Page 47 - It was from out the rind of one apple tasted, that the knowledge of good and evil, as two twins cleaving together, leaped forth into the world. And perhaps this is that doom which Adam fell into of knowing good and evil, that is to say, of knowing good by evil.
Page 86 - passing rich with forty pounds a year?" Ah! no, a Shepherd of a different stock, And far unlike him, feeds this little flock; A jovial youth, who thinks his Sunday's task, As much as God or Man can fairly ask; The rest he gives to loves and labours light, To Fields the morning and to Feasts the night; None better...
Page 47 - As therefore the state of man now is, what wisdom can there be to choose, what continence to forbear without the knowledge of evil? He that can apprehend...
Page 276 - Now within the gate rejoice, Safe and seal'd and bought and blest ! Safe — from all the lures of vice, Seal'd — by signs the chosen know, Bought — by love and life the price, Blest — the mighty debt to owe. " Holy pilgrim ! what for thee, In a world like this remain ? From thy guarded breast shall flee, Fear and shame, and doubt and pain. Fear — the hope of Heaven shall fly, Shame — from glory's view retire, Doubt — in certain rapture die, Pain — in endless bliss expire.
Page 73 - Their country's beauty or their nymphs' rehearse; Yet still for these we frame the tender strain, Still in our lays fond Corydons complain, And shepherds' boys their amorous pains reveal, The only pains, alas ! they never feel.

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