Of Beasts and Beauty: Gender, Race, and Identity in Colombia

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University of Texas Press, Aug 15, 2013 - Social Science - 292 pages
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All societies around the world and through time value beauty highly. Tracing the evolutions of the Colombian standards of beauty since 1845, Michael Edward Stanfield explores their significance to and symbiotic relationship with violence and inequality in the country. Arguing that beauty holds not only social power but also economic and political power, he positions it as a pacific and inclusive influence in a country “ripped apart by violence, private armies, seizures of land, and abuse of governmental authority, one hoping that female beauty could save it from the ravages of the male beast.” One specific means of obscuring those harsh realities is the beauty pageant, of which Colombia has over 300 per year. Stanfield investigates the ways in which these pageants reveal the effects of European modernity and notions of ethnicity on Colombian women, and how beauty for Colombians has become an external representation of order and morality that can counter the pathological effects of violence, inequality, and exclusion in their country.

 

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
1838
Chapter 2
1869
BICYCLE RACE 18851914
1885
Chapter 4
1912
LIBERAL BEAUTY 19301948
1930
Chapter 6
1947
Chapter 7
1961
FROM MISS UNIVERSE TO THE ANTIREINA 19581968
1958
Chapter 9
1978
CONCLUSION AND EPILOGUE TO 2011
1981
NOTES
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Michael Edward Stanfield is Professor of History at the University of San Francisco and author of two other books, including Red Rubber, Bleeding Trees: Violence, Slavery, and Empire in Northwest Amazonia, 1850–1933.

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