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NOTES AND QUERIES:

A

Medium of Enter-Cominunication

FOR

LITERARY MEN, ARTISTS, ANTIQUARIES,

GENEALOGISTS, ETC.

“When found, make a note of.” — CAPTAIN CUTTLE.

VOLUME FOURTH.

JULY - DECEMBER, 1851.

LONDON:
GEORGE BELL, 186. FLEET STREET.

NOTES AND QUERIES:

A

Medium of Inter-Cominunication

FOR

LITERARY MEN, ARTISTS, ANTIQUARIES,

, GENEALOGISTS, ETC.

“When found, make a note of.” —CAPTAIN CUTTLE.

VOLUME FOURTH.

JULY - DECEMBER, 1851.

LONDON:
GEORGE BELL, 186. FLEET STREET.

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command, printed in 1685, and perhaps compiled 4. Astrological rules in French for finding out any, from information given by the king himself, the thing required ; together with a planetary wheel, following statement is made:

dated 1680, to show life or death in case of illness, “ The papers and books that were found on him are also happiness and adversity. — pp. 19–25. since delivered to his Majesty. One of the books was 5. Directions pour savoire si une person sera fidelle a manuscript of spells, charms, and conjurations, songs, ou non," &c. At the bottom is a cypher, in which receipts, and prayers, all written with the said lute Duke's a stands for 10, b for 52, &c., p. 27. All this is own hand. Two others were manuscripts of fortification entered again at pp. 45. 47. and the military art. And a fourth book, fairly written,

6. “ The way from London to East Tilbery,” dated wherein are computes of the yearly expense of his Ma

December 1, 1684. – p. 29. jesty's navy and land forces." It is remarkable that the “pocket-book" men

7. Prayers for the morning and evening, pp. 31-43,

8. List of the Christian names of women and men. tioned by Welwood is not here specified, but it is possible that the entries quoted by him may have

- pp. 44. 46. 48. been written on the pages of one of the other

9. Arithmetical table of the number 7, multiplied books. Two of the above only are noticed by

from 1 to 37: - pp. 49. 51. Mr. Macaulay, namely, “a small treatise on for- 10. Receipts “to take away a corne;" “a soveraign tification,” and “an album filled with songs, re- water of Dr. Stephens;" "to make the face fair;" ceipts, prayers, and charms ;" and there can be no "to make golden letters without gold;" “ to kip reasonable doubt that the latter, which is men- iron from rusting ;" “ to write letters of secrets ;" tioned by the author of the tract in the Harleian “to make hair grow;" "to make hair grow black, Miscellany, as well as by Reresby and Barillon, though of any colour ;” and several more. - pp. 52 is the identical manuscript which forms the subject

-61. of Dr. Anster's remarks.

11. Casualties that happened in the reigns of the EnWithin a few weeks this singular volume has glish sovereigns, from William I. to Queen Mary been added by purchase to the National Collection inclusive ; consisting chiefly of remarkable acci. of Manuscripts in the British Museum, previous dents, and reputed prodigies. - pp. 62—78. to which I ascertained, by a careful comparison 12. “ Socrates, Platon, Aristote et Ciceron ont fait ces of its pages with several undoubted letters of the trente Comandemens pour leurs disciples."- pp.78, Duke of Monmouth (an advantage Dr. Anster 79. did not possess), that the whole of the volume (or 13. “A receipt for the Farcy." — p. 81. nearly so) is certainly in the Duke's handwriting. This evidence might of itself be deemed sufficient;

14. A poem intitled “ The Twin Flame, sent mee by M

8391. but some lines written on the fly-leaf of the volume (which are passed over by Dr. Anster as

The words in Italics have been scribbled over of no moment) confirm the fact beyond all cavil, with the pen for the purpose of concealment. The since, on seeing them, I immediately recognised verses commence : them as the autograph of King James himself. Fantastick wanton god, what dost thou mean, They are as follows:

To breake my rest, make mee grow pale and lean." “ This book was found in the Duke of Monmouth's

15. Receipts for secret writing, to take impressions of pocket when he was taken, and is most of his owne

prints upon glass, to boil plate, &c. — pp. 93-98. handwriting."

16. Several songs in English and French, pp. 99 — Although the contents of this volume have been already described in general terms by Dr. Anster, yet it may not perhaps be uninteresting to give a

Among them are the verses printed in “NOTES more detailed list of what is written in it:- AND QUERIES, Vol. i.,, p. 199., beginning, “ With 1. Receipts “ for the stone;" “ to know the sum of joie we do leave thee,” accompanied by the musinumbers before they be writ doun ;'

cal notes ; and also a song commencing “ All ye toyer l'ovrages de cuyvre argenté; "'" for to make gods that ar above,” with the musical notes. It Bouts and Choos (Boots and Shoes] hold out water;" is most probable that these songs are copied from

and “ to keep the goms well.” — pp. 1-4. 8. printed sources; but as they have been conjec2. Magical receipts and charms in French, written tured to be compositions by Monmouth himself,

, partly in an abbreviated form, accompanied by the following short specimen may not be unaccabalistic figures. Two of these are to deliver a ceptable, copied literatim. person out of prison, and are no doubt the same

“ ( how blest, and how inocent, vhich Sir John Reresby refers to. — pp. 5. 7. 9.

and happy is a country life, 11-17.

free from tumult and discontent; “ The forme of a bill of Excheng," drawn on

heer is no flatterys nor strife, David Nairne of London, from Antwerp, May 16,

for t'was the first and happiest life, 1684, for 2001. sterling. - p. 6.

when first man did injoie him selfe.

P."

- pp.

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