The Invention of Judaism: Torah and Jewish Identity from Deuteronomy to Paul

Front Cover
Univ of California Press, Feb 14, 2017 - Religion - 336 pages
Most people understand Judaism to be the Torah and the Torah to be Judaism. However, in The Invention of Judaism, John J. Collins persuasively argues this was not always the case. The Torah became the touchstone for most of Judaism’s adherents only in the hands of the rabbis of late antiquity. For 600 years prior, from the Babylonian Exile to the Roman destruction of the Second Temple, there was enormous variation in the way the Torah was understood. Collins provides a comprehensive account of the role of the Torah in ancient Judaism, exploring key moments in its history, beginning with the formation of Deuteronomy and continuing through the Maccabean revolt and the rise of Jewish sectarianism and early Christianity.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Jews Judeans and the Maccabean Crisis
1
1 Deuteronomy and the Invention of the Torah
21
2 Torah in the Persian Period
44
3 The Persistence of NonMosaic Judaism
62
4 Torah as Narrative and Wisdom
80
5 Torah as Law
97
6 Torah and Apocalypticism
114
7 The Law in the Diaspora
134
8 Paul Torah and Jewish Identity
159
Epilogue
183
Notes
189
Bibliography
255
Index of Scripture and Other Ancient Sources
301
Index of Modern Authors
313
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2017)

John J. Collins is Professor of Old Testament Criticism and Interpretation at Yale Divinity School. His books include Introduction to the Hebrew Bible, The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Biography and The Apocalyptic Imagination. He is general editor of the Yale Anchor Bible Series.

Bibliographic information