Laws and Models: Science, Engineering, and Technology

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CRC Press, Oct 8, 2018 - Technology & Engineering - 560 pages
The "laws" that govern our physical universe come in many guises-as principles, theorems, canons, equations, axioms, models, and so forth. They may be empirical, statistical, or theoretical, their names may reflect the person who first expressed them, the person who publicized them, or they might simply describe a phenomenon. However they may be named, the discovery and application of physical laws have formed the backbone of the sciences for 3,000 years.

They exist by thousands. Laws and Models: Science, Engineering, and Technology-the fruit of almost 40 years of collection and research-compiles more than 1,200 of the laws and models most frequently encountered and used by engineers and technologists. The result is a collection as fascinating as it is useful. Each entry consists of a statement of the law or model, its date of origin, a one-line biography of the people involved in its formulation, sources of information about the law, and cross-references.
Illustrated and highly readable, this book offers a unique presentation of the vast and rich collection of laws that rule our universe. Everyone with an interest in the inner workings of nature-from engineers to students, from teachers to journalists-will find Laws and Models to be not only a handy reference, but an engaging volume to read and browse.

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Contents

A
11
B
23
c
61
D
105
E
131
F
157
G
177
H
199
o
329
P
339
Q
373
S
405
T
441
U
459
V
463
W
475

I
225
I
235
K
241
L
257
M
283
N
313
X
491
Y
493
Z
497
SOURCES AND REFERENCES
499
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Page 343 - Pressure exerted anywhere upon a mass of liquid is transmitted undiminished in all directions, and acts with the same force on all equal surfaces, and in a direction at right angles to those surfaces.
Page 275 - The logarithm of a quotient is equal to the logarithm of the dividend minus the logarithm of the divisor. , M , ,• , . logi — = log
Page 275 - The logarithm of a root of a number is equal to the logarithm of the number divided by the index of the root.
Page 11 - AIChE American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIME American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers AIP American Institute of Physics...
Page 11 - The total pressure exerted by a mixture of gases is equal to the sum of the partial pressures of the gases in the mixture.
Page 243 - The cubes of the mean distances of the planets from the sun are proportional to the squares of their times of revolution about the sun.
Page 14 - Archimedes stated that a body immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the displaced fluid.
Page 275 - The logarithm of a power of a number is equal to the logarithm of the number multiplied by the exponent of the power. log» Np = p log
Page 267 - The volume of a gas mixture is equal to the sum of the volumes that would be occupied by each of the components of the mixture if at the temperature and pressure of the mixture.
Page 322 - Every particle of matter, in the universe, attracts every other particle with a force, which is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

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