The National quarterly review, ed. by E.I. Sears, Volume 21

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Edward Isidore Sears
1870
 

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Page 18 - But thou, of temples old, or altars new, Standest alone — with nothing like to thee — Worthiest of God, the holy and the true. Since Zion's desolation, when that He Forsook His former city, what could be, Of earthly structures, in His honour piled, Of a sublimer aspect? Majesty, Power, Glory, Strength, and Beauty, all are aisled In this eternal ark of worship undefiled.
Page 22 - Where the car climb'd the Capitol; far and wide Temple and tower went down, nor left a site: Chaos of ruins! who shall trace the void, O'er the dim fragments cast a lunar light, And say, 'here was, or is,
Page 145 - The good old sire the first prepared to go To new-found worlds, and wept for others' woe ; But for himself, in conscious virtue brave, He only wished for worlds beyond the grave.
Page 88 - O, it strikes, it strikes! Now, body, turn to air, Or Lucifer will bear thee quick to hell. (Thunder and lightning. O soul, be changed into little water-drops, And fall into the ocean- — ne'er be found.
Page 336 - Wind, gentle evergreen, to form a shade Around the tomb where Sophocles is laid ; Sweet ivy wind thy boughs, and intertwine With blushing roses and the clustering vine : Thus will thy lasting leaves with beauties hung, Prove grateful emblems of the lays he sung ; Whose soul, exalted like a god of wit, Among the Muses and the Graces writ.
Page 288 - Britannia needs no bulwarks, No towers along the steep ; Her march is o'er the mountain waves, Her home is on the deep.
Page 229 - The merit of this prince, both in private and public life, may with advantage be set in opposition to that of any monarch or citizen which the annals of any age or any nation can present to us. He seems, indeed, to be the model of that perfect character, which, under the denomination of a sage or wise man, philosophers have been fond of delineating, rather as a fiction of their imagination, than in hopes of ever seeing it really existing...
Page 248 - ... moment, — the most brilliant, the most enviable, in short, a thing of which no example is to be found in past times ; at...
Page 77 - ... demons. From this yawning cave the devils themselves constantly ascended to delight and to instruct the spectators: — to delight, because they were usually the greatest jesters and buffoons that then appeared ; and to instruct, for that they treated the wretched mortals who were delivered to them with the utmost cruelty, warning thereby all men carefully to avoid the falling into the clutches of such hardened and remorseless spirits.
Page 94 - ... sort of shifting companions that run through every art and thrive by none, to leave the trade of Noverint, whereto they were born, and busy themselves with the endeavors of art, that could scarcely Latinize their neck-verse if they should have need; yet English Seneca, read by candle-light, yields many good sentences, as blood is a beggar...

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