Sketches of Germany. Art-Literature-Character

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Jugel, 1837 - Germany - 356 pages

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Page 51 - Many a man lives a burden to the earth; but a good book is the precious lifeblood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life. It is true no age can restore a life, whereof perhaps there is no great loss; and revolutions of ages do not oft recover the loss of a rejected truth, for the want of which whole nations fare the worse.
Page 145 - ... professor of theology in a university of Courland, I think at Riga, or somewhere near it, for the name of this city was continually recurring in her narrative. Henri was at this time about eightand-twenty. While here, it was his fate to fall passionately in love with the daughter of a rich Jew merchant. His religious zeal mingled with his love ; he was as anxious to convert his mistress as to possess her — and, in fact, the first was a necessary preliminary to the second : the consequences...
Page 160 - Are you Mademoiselle Emilie S • ?' I suppose I must have looked very strange, and wild, and resolute ; for she replied with a frightened manner, '1 am, who are you, and what do you want with me ?' I said, ' I am the sister of Henri Ambos, whom you murdered...
Page 158 - Her story excited much commiseration, and a very general interest and curiosity was excited about herself. She told me that a great many persons of rank invited her to their houses, and made her rich presents, among which were the splendid shawls and the ring which had caught my attention, and excited my surprise, in the first instance. The Emperor expressed a wish to see her, and very graciously spoke a few words of condolence. " But they could not bring my brother back to life !" said she, expressively....
Page 161 - ... she would not bid me farewell that night, although I told her I should be obliged to set off at six the next morning; but kissing my hand, with many expressions of gratitude, she said she would be awake, and visit me in my room to bid me a last adieu. As there was only a very narrow passage between the two rooms, she left her door a little open that she might hear me rise. However, on the following morning she did not appear. When dressed, I went on tip-toe into her room, and found her lying...
Page 143 - Soon afterwards came the mistress of the inn, (who had never deigned to notice me, for it is not the fashion in Germany ;) she came with an offer of particular services, and, from the conversation, I gathered, to my astonishment, that this young creature — she seemed not more than two or three and twenty — was on her way home, alone and unprotected, from — can you imagine * even from the wilds of Siberia ! But then, what had brought her there ? I listened, in hopes of discovering : but they...
Page 98 - ... and showed me his wrist, swelled with the continual use of his implements — " You see I cannot ! " And I could not help wishing, at the moment, that while his mind was thus enfeebled, no transient return of physical strength might enable him to put his wild threat in execution. What a noble bequest to posterity is the effigy of a great man, when executed in such a spirit as this of Schiller ! I assure you I could not look at it without feeling my heart " overflow in silent worship...
Page 157 - What a horrible fate was mine ! I had come thus far to find — not my brother — only a grave !" she repeated several times, with an accent of despair. The unfortunate man had died a year before. The fetters in which he worked had caused an ulcer in his leg, which he neglected, — and, after some weeks of horrid suffering, death released him. The task-work, for nearly five years, of this accomplished, and even learned man, in the prime of his life and mental powers, had been to break stones upon...
Page 149 - I call God to witness that my brother was innocent ! and I thank God that you are not the emperor, for I can still hope !" The minister, in a rage, said, " Do you dare to speak thus to me ! Do you know who I am ?" —
Page 150 - I cannot dare to present your petition myself; I might be sent off to Siberia, or at least banished the court ; but all I can do I will, I will lend you my equipage and servants — I will dress you in one of my robes ; you shall drive to the palace the next...

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