Binge-Eating Disorder: Clinical Foundations and Treatment

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Guilford Press, Oct 18, 2007 - Psychology - 214 pages
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This innovative scientific reference and clinical tool is virtually two books in one. Part I thoroughly yet succinctly reviews the literature on binge-eating disorder, covering diagnosis and epidemiology, clinical features and course, links to obesity, medical risks, and current treatment data. Part II provides an evidence-based cognitive-behavioral treatment manual. Session-by-session guidelines address how to help individuals or groups change their eating behavior, cope with emotional triggers, restructure problematic thoughts, deal with body image concerns and associated problems, maintain improvement, and prevent relapse. Featured are more than 40 clearly explained homework assignments and handouts, all in a large-size format with permission to photocopy. 

 

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Contents

Diagnosis and Epidemiology of BingeEating Disorder
3
Clinical Features Longitudinal Course and Psychopathology of BingeEating Disorder
13
BingeEating Disorder and Obesity
23
Eating Behavior Psychobiology Medical Risks and Pharmacotherapy of BingeEating Disorder
35
BingeEating Disorder and Bariatric Surgery
49
Psychotherapy for BingeEating Disorder
58
BingeEating Disorder and the Future
70
SessionbySession Therapist Guidelines
83
SessionbySession Handouts and Worksheets
109
References
189
Index
209
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Page 4 - A. Recurrent episodes of binge eating. An episode of binge eating is characterized by both of the following: 1. Eating, in a discrete period of time (eg, within any 2-hour period), an amount of food that is definitely larger than most people would eat during a similar period of time and under similar circumstances 2.
Page 4 - ... similar circumstances (2) a sense of lack of control over eating during the episode (eg, a feeling that one cannot stop eating or control what or how much one is eating) B.
Page 4 - The binge eating occurs, on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months. E. The binge eating is not associated with the regular use of inappropriate compensatory behaviors (eg, purging, fasting, excessive exercise) and does not occur exclusively during the course of Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia Nervosa.
Page 4 - The binge-eating episodes are associated with three (or more) of the following: (1 ) eating much more rapidly than normal (2) eating until feeling uncomfortably full (3) eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry (4) eating alone because of being embarrassed by how much one is eating (5) feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed, or very guilty after overeating C. Marked distress regarding binge eating at present.
Page 4 - ... eating until feeling uncomfortably full (3) eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry (4) eating alone because of being embarrassed by how much one is eating (5) feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed, or very guilty after overeating C. Marked distress regarding binge eating is present. D. The binge eating occurs, on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months. Note: The method of determining frequency differs from that used for Bulimia Nervosa; future research should...
Page 3 - Although antisocial personality disorder (APD) is treated in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as...
Page 189 - M. (1994). Weight loss, cognitive-behavioral, and desipramine treatments in binge eating disorder. An additive design.

About the author (2007)

James E. Mitchell, MD, is NRI/Lee A. Christofferson, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences and President of the Neuropsychiatric Research Institute. Dr. Mitchell focuses primarily on research in the areas of eating disorders and obesity. He is past president of the Academy for Eating Disorders and the Eating Disorders Research Society and is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Eating Disorders. Dr. Mitchell has published more than 300 scientific articles and has either authored or edited 12 books.

 

Michael J. Devlin, MD, is Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Associate Director of the Eating Disorders Research Unit at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. His major academic interest is in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with eating disorders. Dr. Devlin is an active member of the Academy for Eating Disorders and is past president of that organization. He serves on the editorial boards of two journals, the International Journal of Eating Disorders and Eating Behaviors. In addition to research in eating disorders, Dr. Devlin is active in medical student education and in the training and supervision of psychiatry residents, particularly in cognitive-behavioral therapy.

 

Martina de Zwaan, MD, is Professor and Head of the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy at the University Hospital of Erlangen, Germany. She is the author of numerous scientific and clinical papers on the subject of eating disorders, mainly bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and obesity.

 

Scott J. Crow, MD, is Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Minnesota. His research examines the course, outcome, and treatment of eating disorders and obesity. Dr. Crow is the recipient of an Independent Scientist Award (from the National Institute of Mental Health) focusing on the course, outcome, and treatment of eating disorders. He is past president of the Academy for Eating Disorders and director of the Eating Disorder/Assessment Core of the Minnesota Obesity Center.

 

Carol B. Peterson, PhD, is Research Associate/Assistant Professor in the Eating Disorders Research Program at the University of Minnesota, where her investigations have focused on the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and obesity. She has authored over 50 articles and book chapters and has served as an investigator on several federally funded grants. Dr. Peterson is also Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota and has a part-time private practice in which she specializes in the treatment of eating disorders.

 

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