The poetry of science; or, Studies of the physical phenomena of nature

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Page 365 - There is not wind enough in the air To move away the ringlet curl From the lovely lady's cheek— There is not wind enough to twirl The one red leaf, the last of its clan, That dances as often as dance it can, Hanging so light, and hanging so high, On the topmost twig that looks up at the sky.
Page 98 - The mutual action between the elements of the food and the oxygen conveyed by the circulation of the blood to every part of the body is the source of animal heat.
Page 351 - A primrose by the river's brim, A yellow primrose was to him, And it was nothing more.
Page 403 - Have the gates of death been opened unto thee? Or hast thou seen the doors of the shadow of death? Hast thou perceived the breadth of the earth? Declare if thou knowest it all.
Page 197 - ... the electricity which decomposes, and that which is evolved by the decomposition of a certain quantity of matter, are alike.
Page 328 - geology, in the magnitude and sublimity of the objects of which it treats, undoubtedly ranks, in the scale of the sciences, next to astronomy...
Page 221 - De la Rive.— A Treatise on Electricity, in Theory and Practice. By A. DE LA RIVE, Professor in the Academy of Geneva.
Page 114 - The conquest of Egypt by the Arabs diffused that vain science over the globe. Congenial to the avarice of the human heart, it was studied in China as in Europe, with equal eagerness, and with equal success. The darkness of the middle ages ensured a favourable reception to every tale of wonder, and the revival of learning gave new vigour to hope, and suggested more specious arts of deception.
Page 349 - Themselves, within their holy bound, Their stony folds had often found. They told, how sea-fowls...

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