Radical Visions 1968-2008: The Impact of the Sixties on Australian Drama

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Rodopi, 2011 - Drama - 296 pages
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Radical Visions 1968-2008: The Impact of the Sixties on Australian Drama is about a generation of Australian playwrights who came of age in the sixties. This important book shows how international trends in youth radicalism and cultural change at the time contributed to the rise of interest in alternative theatre and drama in a number of locations. It follows the career of Australia’s major playwrights — Alma De Groen, Jenny Kemp, Richard Murphet, John Romeril, Stephen Sewell and David Williamson — whose early plays were first performed at La Mama and the Pram Factory theatres in Melbourne in the sixties and seventies and who continue to make new work. The book’s dual purpose is to examine the impact of the sixties on playwriting and update the scholarship on the contemporary works with close readings of the plays of the nineties and the first decade of the twenty-first century. By analysing the recent plays, the book traces the continuing impact of left wing politics and cultural change on Australian theatre and society.
 

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Contents

List of Figures
9
Series Editors Preface
12
Acknowledgements
13
Introduction
15
The International Generation of 1968 Theatre and Culture
41
The Australian Performing Group and Its Legacy 19682008
57
Williamson in the Howard Years
79
John Romeril The Asian Australian Journey
127
A Parallel FortyYear Female Narrative with Alma De Groen
149
Richard Murphet and the Wounded Subject
175
Jenny Kemp On the Edge
209
Stephen Sewell and the State of the Nation
239
Conclusion
269
Bibliography
273
Index
287
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About the author (2011)

Associate Professor Denise Varney is in the English and Theatre Programin the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne. She is co-author of "The Dolls Revolution: Australian Theatre and Cultural Imagination" and editor of "Theatre in the Berlin Republic: German Drama Since Reunification.

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