Love's Pilgrimage: The Holy Journey in English Renaissance Literature

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University of Delaware Press, 2006 - Literary Criticism - 217 pages
In Love's Pilgrimage, Grace Tiffany explores literary adaptations of the Catholic pilgrimage in the Protestant poetry and prose of Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, John Donne, John Milton, and John Bunyan. Her discussion of these authors' works illuminates her larger claim that while in the sixteenth century conventional pilgrimages to saints' shrines disappeared - as did shrines themselves - from English life, the imaginative importance of the pilgrimage persisted, and manifested itself in various ways in English culture.

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Contents

The Protestant Pilgrimage
13
Protestant Pilgrimage and Secular State in Book I of Spensers The Faerie Queene
44
Imperial Pilgrimage on Shakespeares Stage
68
For Fidelia Fidele Compostela and Erotic Pilgrimage in Alls Well That Ends Well Cymbeline and Othello
87
The Passionate Pilgrim From Sacramental Eros to the Mapped Body in the Poems of John Donne
110
Milton and the Pilgrim Reader
134
Coda The Pilgrims Progress in English Renaissance Literature
162
Notes
172
Bibliography
198
Index
212
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Page 13 - The Romish Doctrine concerning Purgatory, Pardons, Worshipping and Adoration, as well of Images as of Relics, and also Invocation of Saints, is a fond thing, vainly invented, and grounded upon no warranty of Scripture, but rather repugnant to the Word of God.
Page 196 - Hath left in shadows dread His burning idol all of blackest hue; In vain with cymbals' ring They call the grisly king, In dismal dance about the furnace blue ; The brutish gods of Nile as fast, Isis and Orus and the dog Anubis, haste.
Page 134 - He that can apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better, he is the true wayfaring Christian.
Page 27 - Andrew, dock'd in sand, Vailing her high-top lower than her ribs To kiss her burial. Should I go to church And see the holy edifice of stone, And not bethink me straight of dangerous rocks, Which touching but my gentle vessel's side, Would scatter all her spices on the stream, Enrobe the roaring waters with my silks...
Page 5 - From whence the enlightened spirit sees That shady city of palm trees. But ah ! my soul with too much stay Is drunk, and staggers in the way ! Some men a forward motion love, But I by backward steps would move; And when this dust falls to the urn, In that state I came, return.
Page 64 - Dame, and for her coche doth call: All hurtlen forth, and she with Princely pace, As faire Aurora in her purple pall, Out of the East the dawning day doth call : So forth she comes...
Page 116 - T'afFections, and to faculties, Which sense may reach and apprehend, Else a great prince in prison lies.
Page 189 - ... I'll kneel down, And ask of thee forgiveness : so we'll live, And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh At gilded butterflies, and hear poor rogues Talk of court news ; and we'll talk with them too, Who loses and who wins ; who's in, who's out ; And take...
Page 156 - From heaven, they fabled, thrown by angry Jove Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star, On Lemnos the /Egean isle : thus they relate, Erring...

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