History of the French revolution, and of the wars resulting from that memorable event. 11 vols. [in 12. Wanting the title-leaves of vol.4,5,8].

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Page 212 - with a feeling that I should never rise in my profession. My mind was staggered with a view of the difficulties I had to surmount, and the little interest I possessed. I could discover no means of reaching the object of my ambition. After a long and gloomy reverie, in which I almost wished myself overboard, a sudden glow of patriotism was kindled within me, and presented my king and country as my patron. Well, then," I exclaimed, " I will be a hero ! and, confiding in Providence, I will brave every...
Page 235 - To be deserted by my fleet in the face of an enemy, is a disgrace which I believe never before happened to a British admiral; nor could I have supposed it possible. My greatest comfort under God is, that I have been supported by the officers, seamen, and marines, of this ship ; for which, with a heart overflowing with gratitude, I request you to accept my sincere thanks. I flatter myself much good may result from your example, by bringing those deluded people to a sense of the duty which they owe...
Page 274 - HIs end was suited to the simple greatness of mind which he displayed through life ; every way unaffected, without levity, without ostentation, full of natural grace and dignity. He appeared neither to wish nor to dread ; but patiently and placidly to await the appointed hour of his dissolution.
Page 39 - Had all my actions," said he, writing at this time to his wife, ".been gazetted, not one fortnight would have passed, during the whole war, without a letter from me. One day or other I will have a long gazette to myself. - I feel that such an opportunity will be given me. I cannot, if I am in the field of glory, be kept out of sight: wherever there is anything to be done, there Providence is sure to direct my steps.
Page 68 - I will endeavour, as much as lies in my ability, to forward a brotherhood of affection, an identity of interests, a communion of rights, and an union of power, among Irishmen of all religious persuasions, without which every reform in parliament must be partial, not national, inadequate to the wants, delusive to the wishes, and insufficient for the freedom and happiness of this country.
Page 215 - Success attend Admiral Nelson ! God bless Captain Miller ! We thank them for the officers they have placed over us. We are happy and comfortable, and will shed every drop of blood in our veins to support them ; and the name of the Theseus shall be immortalised as high as the Captain's.
Page 98 - The question, as it evidently appeared to his view, was not about this or that concession, but whether the country should be laid prostrate at the feet of France ? It was, in fact, a matter of no moment, whether it was laid prostrate at the feet of monarchical or republican France, for still the event would be equally fatal, equally destructive.
Page 218 - I am as old as the Prime Minister of England, and think myself as capable of commanding one of His Majesty's ships as that Minister is of governing the State.
Page 483 - Every village which shall submit to the French, shall hoist the French flag, and that of the Sublime Porte, their Ally, whose duration be eternal.
Page 474 - The people, among whom you are going to live, are Mahometans. The first article of their faith is " There is no other God but God, and Mahomet is his prophet.

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