The Geography of Empire in English Literature, 1580-1745

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Sep 28, 1999 - Literary Criticism - 284 pages
Between 1580 and 1745--Edmund Spenser's journey to an unconquered Ireland and the Jacobite Rebellion--the first British Empire was established. This ambitious book argues that England's culture during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries was saturated with a geographic imagination fed by the experiences and experiments of colonialism. Using theories of space and its production to ground his readings, Bruce McLeod skillfully explores how works by Spenser, Milton, Aphra Behn, Mary Rowlandson, Daniel Defoe and Jonathan Swift imagine, interrogate and narrate the adventure and geography of empire.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

nationstate
32
Contracting geography from the country house to the colony
76
Milton Behn and Rowlandson
120
the islands
164
the politics of space
242
Notes
249
Works cited
263
Index
280
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information