Miscellanea nova

Front Cover
R. Marchbank, 1801 - 280 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 166 - Delight; Her beauty was beyond compare, She was both Virtuous and Fair. There was a young Man living by, Who was so charmed with her Eye, That he could never be at rest, He was by Love...
Page 20 - Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that: You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.
Page 186 - It was but this very morning that he had obtained her parents' consent, and it was but till the next week that they were to wait to be happy. Perhaps...
Page 178 - He had no sooner brought his men to the engagement, but finding himself utterly spent, he was again replaced in his litter, where, laying his finger on his mouth, to enjoin secrecy to his officers who stood about him, he died a few moments after, in that posture.
Page 178 - ... battle was given; but, knowing the fatal consequences that would happen to his children and people, in case he should die before he put an end to that war, he commanded his principal officers, that if he died during the engagement, they should conceal his death from the army, and that they...
Page 88 - When what t' oblivion better were resign'd Is hung on high, to poison half mankind. All fame is foreign but of true desert, Plays round the head, but comes not to the heart : One...
Page 186 - ... this faithful pair : John with one arm about Sarah's neck, and the other held over her, as to fcreen her from the lightning.
Page 182 - Monimia talks very tenderly upon this subject: -It was not kind To leave me like a turtle here alone, To droop and mourn the absence of my mate. When thou art from me, every place is desert: And I, methinks, am savage and forlorn. Thy presence only 'tis can make me blest, Heal my unquiet mind, and tune my soul.
Page 177 - Morocco, in order to dethrone him, and set his crown upon the head of his nephew, Moluc was wearing away with a distemper which he himself knew was incurable. However, he prepared for the reception of so formidable an enemy.
Page 187 - ... signs of life were found in either. Attended by their melancholy companions, they were conveyed to the town, and the next day were interred in Stanton-Harcourt church-yard.

Bibliographic information