Reformation: Europe's House Divided 1490-1700

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Penguin UK, Sep 2, 2004 - History - 864 pages
15 Reviews
The Reformation was the seismic event in European history over the past 1000 years, and one which tore the medieval world apart. Not just European religion, but thought, culture, society, state systems, personal relations - everything - was turned upside down. Just about everything which followed in European history can be traced back in some way to the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation which it provoked. The Reformation is where the modern world painfully and dramatically began, and MacCulloch's great history of it is recognised as the best modern account.
 

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User Review  - charlie68 - LibraryThing

Good if rather over long read into the Reformation and being a Christian made for a lot of introspection. All the major players are here Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin, pretty comprehensive look at this ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - FKarr - LibraryThing

stunning; detailed, clear; gives excellent background to the Reformation's major issues; well balanced treatment of individuals and larger forces; more focused on religious than political figures Read full review

Contents

ListofIllustrations and Maps
Preface and Acknowledgements
A COMMON CULTURE
Church Versus Commonwealth? 2 HOPES AND FEARS 14901517
NEW EARTH151724
CATHOLICANDPROTESTANT 153060
The15412Crisis A Council at Trent The First Session15459
Protestant Divisions Confirmed
15701619
A BRITISH LEGACY 16001700
PATTERNS OF LIFE 13 CHANGING TIMES
DEATH LIFE AND DISCIPLINE
STAYING THE SAME
MOVING
OUTCOMES Wars of Reformation Tolerating Difference
Creeds Lords Prayer Ten Commandments

REUNIONSCORNED 154770 Crisis For the Habsburgs 154755
England 15538 15589 Turningpoints for Dynasties

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About the author (2004)

Diarmaid MacCulloch is Professor of the History of the Church at Oxford University. His Thomas Cranmer (1996) won the Whitbread Biography Prize, the James Tait Black Prize and the Duff Cooper Prize; Reformation: Europe's House Divided 1490-1700 (2004) won the Wolfson Prize and the British Academy Prize. A History of Christianity (2010), which was adapted into a six-part BBC television series, was awarded the Cundill and Hessel-Tiltman Prizes. His Gifford Lectures at the University of Edinburgh were published in 2013 as Silence: A Christian History. His most recent television series (2015) was Sex and the Church. He was knighted in 2012.

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