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Books Books 1 - 5 of 5 on I ever thought you an extraordinary man, and must now think you such a friend, who,....
" I ever thought you an extraordinary man, and must now think you such a friend, who, being a courtier, as you are, can love a man, whom it is the great mode to hate. "
The Works of John Earl of Rochester: Containing Poems, on Several Occasions ... - Page 144
by John Wilmot Earl of Rochester - 1714 - 314 pages
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Familiar Letters, Volume 1

English letters - 1705 - 207 pages
...Thoughts,if not quite forgot me by this time. I ever thought you an extraordinary Man, and muft now think ypu fuch a Friend, who, being a Courtier, as you are,...Man, whom it is the great Mode to hate. Catch Sir 0. H. or Sir 6trr, at fuch an ill-bred Proceeding, and I am miftaken : For the hideous Deportment,...
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A Select collection of original letters, Volume 2

English letters - 1755
...me afide in his Thoughts, if not quite forgot me by this time. I ever thought you an extraordinary Man, and muft now think you fuch a Friend, who, being...hideous Deportment, which you have heard of, concerning running naked, fo much is true, that we went into the River fomewhat late in the Year, and had a Frifk...
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The Sewanee Review, Volume 24

Literature - 1916
...he had been charged, adding : " I ever thought you an extraordinary man, and must now think you such a friend, who, being a courtier, as you are, can love a man, whom it is the great mode to hate." The "actual and definite code of morality" that Mr. Palmer finds in The Country Wife becomes on a really...
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Literary Studies

Charles Whibley - English literature - 1919 - 370 pages
...an old friend.' ' I ever thought you an extraordinary man,' says he, ' and must now think you such a friend, who, being a courtier, as you are, can love a man, whom it is the great mode to hate.' II Nor was exaggeration the only foe of the wits. Many there were, without a spark of talent, who imitated...
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Cambridge History of English Literature 8: The Age of Dryden

A. W. Ward, A. R. Waller - Literary Criticism - 1932 - 398 pages
...an old friend.' ' I ever thought you an extraordinary man,' says he, ' and must now think you such a friend, who, being a courtier, as you are, can love a man, whom it is the great mode to hate.' Nor was exaggeration the only foe of the wits. Many there were, without a spark of talent, who imitated...
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