First Lessons in Composition: In which the Principles of the Art are Developed in Connection with the Principles of Grammar : Embracing Full Directions on the Subject of Punctuation, with Copious Exercises

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D. Appleton & Company, 1858 - English language - 182 pages
 

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Page 64 - The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit...
Page 58 - No matter how poor I am ; no matter though the prosperous of my own time will not enter my obscure dwelling, if the sacred writers will enter and take up their abode under my roof, if Milton will cross my threshold to sing to me of Paradise, and...
Page 148 - IN that pleasant district of merry England which is watered by the river Don, there extended in ancient times a large forest, covering the greater part of the beautiful hills and valleys which lie between Sheffield and the pleasant town of Doncaster.
Page 64 - Jane, he'll set his pinafore afire !) Thou imp of mirth and joy ! In love's dear chain so strong and bright a link, Thou idol of thy parents...
Page 105 - The mingling notes came softened from below; The swain responsive as the milkmaid sung, The sober herd that lowed to meet their young, The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school, The watchdog's voice that bayed the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind; — These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And filled each pause the nightingale had made.
Page 91 - Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day. 2. Never trouble another for what you can do yourself. 3. Never spend your money before you have it. 4. Never buy what you do not want, because it is cheap ; it will be dear to you. 5. Pride costs us more than hunger, thirst, and cold. 6. We never repent of having eaten too little.
Page 173 - Long to my joys my dearest lord is lost, His country's buckler, and the Grecian boast : Now from my fond embrace, by tempests torn, Our other column of the state is borne : Nor took a kind adieu, nor sought consent...
Page 106 - It scarce deserved his verse. With nature's self He seemed an old acquaintance, free to jest At will with all her glorious majesty. He laid his hand upon " the ocean's mane," And played familiar with his hoary locks.
Page 147 - Lo, these are but a part of his ways ; but the thunder of his Power, who can understand...
Page 161 - ... the Supreme Being. In a familiar discourse he had mentioned his special prerogative, that the angel of death was not allowed to take his soul till he had respectfully asked the permission of the prophet.

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