The Flood Myths of Early China

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Jun 1, 2006 - History - 248 pages
Explores how the flood myths of early China provided a template for that society's major social and political institutions.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
CHINESE FLOOD MYTHS
16
FLOOD TAMING AND COSMOGONY
21
SOCIAL DIVISIONS AND THE FLOOD
28
THE FLOOD AND THE HUMANANIMAL DIVIDE
33
THE FLOOD AND HUMAN NATURE
38
THE FLOOD AND LOCAL CULTURES
43
CONCLUSION
47
FLOOD TAMING AND LINEAGES
79
THE DEMON CHILD
85
FATHERS SONS AND THE COLLAPSE OF SOCIAL DIVISIONS
99
CONCLUSION
106
FLOOD TAMING COUPLES AND THE BODY
109
THE MYTHOLOGY OF NU GUA AND THE FLOOD
110
THE MYTHOLOGY OF NU GUA AND FU XI
116
THE ICONOGRAPHY OF NU GUA AND FU XI
125

FLOOD TAMING AND CRIMINALITY
49
CRIMINALITY AND THE COLLAPSE OF SOCIAL DIVISIONS
50
GONG GONG AS A CRIMINAL
55
GUN AS A CRIMINAL
60
CRIMINALITY AND FLOOD IN THE SHAN HAI JING
64
CRIMINALITY FLOODS AND THE EXILE OF SONS
72
CONCLUSION
76
YU MARRIAGE AND THE BODY
134
CONCLUSION
143
CONCLUSION
147
NOTES
153
WORKS CITED
209
INDEX
231
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Mark Edward Lewis is Kwoh-ting Li Professor of Chinese Culture at Stanford University and the author of Writing and Authority in Early China and The Construction of Space in Early China, both published by SUNY Press.

Bibliographic information