A Girton Girl, Volume 1

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R. Bentley, 1885 - 298 pages
 

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Page 113 - Guernesiase for someone good enough to help me in my attempts at work, and that Mr. Geoffrey Arbuthnot offered to be that someone. I hope, sir, you do not repent you of the offer already ? " So he stood in presence of the heiress; a little country girl with sun-kissed hands, innocent of ink stains, a child's fledgeling figure, a child's delightful boldness, and not one barleycorn's weight of dignity in her composition. Should he, obeying first impulse, believe in her, and so incur the fate of well...
Page 99 - Gaston, it was his duty to further, if he could, the happiness of them both. The sun should not go down on his despair. He would see his rival, would visit Dinah Thurston's lover to-night. Gaston Arbuthnot, a man of means, which he considerably lived beyond, occupied charmingly furnished rooms in the first court of Jesus. Peacock's feathers and sunflowers had not, happily for saner England, been then invented. A human...
Page 119 - The style was too foreign, altogether, for English taste. And the white and red dress, the gaudy waist ribbon, were too evidently got up for effect, Geoffrey decided, now that he could draw breath, and criticise. The complexion, too, to a man who for years had had a living ideal of snow and rose-bloom before him, was certainly sallow. And those great black eyes . . . Stopping short, Marjorie •waited for her visitor on the schoolroom threshold. At the moment he overtook her, she turned, looked up...
Page 42 - Oh, Mr. Geoffrey will be frightfully snubbed. It is only right to prepare him beforehand." Mrs. Thorne raised her eyes — very fine and sparkling eyes they looked just then — to Geoffrey Arbuthnot's face. "I shall like the sensation,
Page 36 - Thorne looked, without showing she looked, at the three Arbuthnots in turn. " You think Mr. Geoffrey Arbuthnot more than capable of guiding the whole combined feminine intellect of our poor little •Guernsey. Do you not, Mrs. Arbuthnot ? " Linda asked this with the North Pole voice that puts the social position of a feminine questioner at so vast a distance from the social position of her, questioned. " I know nothing about intellect, except what I hear from Geoffrey and my husband. I am quite uneducated,...
Page 40 - go further. I call her an aboriginal." " I see her with my mind's eye. Geoffrey, accept my condolences. All these classico- mathematical girls," observed Gaston, " are the same. Much nose, little hair, freckles, ankles. Let the conversation be changed." "Marjorie has too little rather than too much nose, and is certainly too dark for freckles. It seems, Mr. Gaston Arbuthnot, that you have grown cynical in these latter days. If I were a girl again I should be wild to become a pupil of Mr. Geoffrey's...
Page 94 - ... can offer. If he had had a man's metal, if, instead of flying like a schoolboy, he had said to her, on that evening when Gaston drove past them at the gate, " Take me or reject me, but choose!"—had he thus spoken, Geoffrey used to think, he might have won her. To-night, on the Guernsey waste land, with heaven so broad above, with earth so friendly, the past seemed to return to him without effort of his own, and without sting. The fortnight he passed in London, the unknown relatives who beset...
Page 14 - ... carriages, young men of every sort and condition would lose their peace, if Dinah did but demurely walk along London pavement or provincial street. She was an altogether unique specimen of our mixed and over-featured race : white and rose of complexion ; chiselled of profile, with English-coloured hair (and this hair is neither gold nor flaxen nor chestnut, but a subdued blending of the three) ; eyebrows and eyelashes that matched ; a nobly cut throat ; and the slow, calm movements that belong...
Page 137 - For the sake of Spain, benighted Spain !' remarked the Seigneur genially. ' My granddaughter's blood is half Spanish, Mr. Arbuthnot. I had a son once—an only son ' Could it really be that Andros Bartrand's firm voice for a second faltered ? ' When he was no longer a young man he went to Cadiz, for health's sake, and married, poor fellow, a Spanish girl who died at the end of the year. Marjorie has stayed a few times among her mother's family...

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