Prison Conditions in Israel and the Occupied Territories

Front Cover
Human Rights Watch, 1991 - Political Science - 118 pages
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Contents

XI
23
XII
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XIII
27
XV
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XVI
31
XVII
33
XVIII
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XX
35

XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XLII
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XLIII
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XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLIX
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L
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LI
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Copyright

Common terms and phrases

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Page 67 - Individual or mass forcible transfers, as well as deportations of protected persons from occupied territory to the territory of the Occupying Power or to that of any other country, occupied or not, are prohibited, regardless of their motive.
Page 71 - The Detaining Power is bound to take all necessary and possible measures to ensure that protected persons shall, from the outset of their internment, be accommodated in buildings or quarters which afford every possible safeguard as regards hygiene and health, and provide efficient protection against the rigours of the climate and the effects of the war. In no case shall permanent places of internment be situated in unhealthy areas, or in districts the climate of which is injurious to the internees....
Page 42 - Every prisoner who is not employed in out-door work shall have at least one hour of suitable exercise in the open air daily if the weather permits. (2) Young prisoners, and others of suitable age and physique, shall receive physical and recreational training during the period of exercise. To this end space, installations and equipment should be provided.
Page 116 - Canteens shall be installed in every place of internment, except where other suitable facilities are available. Their purpose shall be to enable internees to make purchases, at prices not higher than local market prices, of foodstuffs and articles of everyday use, including soap and tobacco, such as would increase their personal well-being and comfort. Profits made by canteens shall be credited to a welfare fund to be set up for each place of internment, and administered for the benefit of the internees...
Page 90 - Prisoners shall be allowed under necessary supervision to communicate with their family and reputable friends at regular intervals, both by correspondence and by receiving visits.
Page 14 - In all cases where the district, in which a protected person is temporarily interned, is in an unhealthy area or has a climate which is harmful to his health, he shall be removed to a more suitable place of internment as rapidly as circumstances permit. The premises shall be fully protected from dampness, adequately heated and lighted, in particular between dusk and lights out. The sleeping quarters shall be sufficiently spacious and well ventilated, and the internees shall have suitable bedding...
Page 115 - Every prisoner on admission shall be provided with written information about the regulations governing the treatment of prisoners of his category, the disciplinary requirements of the institution, the authorized methods of seeking information and making complaints, and all such other matters as are necessary to enable him to understand both his rights and his obligations and to adapt himself to the life of the institution.
Page 67 - Protected persons accused of offences shall be detained in the occupied country, and if convicted they shall serve their sentences therein. They shall, if possible, be separated from other detainees and shall enjoy conditions of food and hygiene which will be sufficient to keep them in good health, and which will be at least equal to those obtaining in prisons in the occupied country. They shall receive the medical attention required by...
Page 35 - No prisoner shall be punished unless he has been informed of the offence alleged against him and given a proper opportunity of presenting his defence.
Page 116 - ARTICLE 87 Canteens shall be installed in every place of internment, except where other suitable facilities are available. Their purpose shall be to enable internees to make purchases, at prices not higher than local market prices, of foodstuffs and articles of everyday use, including soap and tobacco, such as would increase their personal well-being and comfort. Profits made by canteens shall be credited to a welfare fund...

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