Rare Days in Japan

Front Cover
Dodd, Mead, 1910 - Electronic book - 341 pages
"American philosopher and psychologist George Trumbull Ladd chronicles his visits to Japan in 1892, where he presented a series of lectures on philosophy, primarily the philosophy of religion. the author shares with readers his impressions of Japanese life and Japanese character in the late nineteenth century." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 42 - ... the senior, the inferior must take orders from the superior, who transmit them to our direct command, and inferior and junior officers and men must pay respect to their superiors and seniors, even though they be not their direct superiors and seniors. Superiors must never be proud or haughty towards those of lower rank, and severity of discipline must be reserved for exceptional cases. In all other cases superiors must treat those beneath them with kindness and especial clemency, so that all...
Page 41 - Soldiers must be polite in their behavior and ways. In the Army and Navy there are hierarchical ranks from the Marshal to the private or bluejacket, which bind together the whole for purposes of command, and there are also the gradations of seniority within the same rank. The Junior must obey the senior, the Inferior must take orders from the superior, who transmits to them Our direct command, and inferior and junior officers and men must pay respect to their superiors and seniors, even though they...
Page 79 - ... retinue ; and with the commonalty, men, women and children, on foot, all with their dresses turned up for facility of movement, and for the most part taking the journey pretty easily ; frequently stopping at the numberless tea-houses or resting sheds by the way, and refreshing themselves with the simple little cup of weak green tea, and a cheery chat with whomsoever might stop like themselves to re^st. It used to seem that distance was no consideration with them. They could go on all day, and...
Page 301 - ... cold reasoning will not help you far in the opposite direction. The evidence of the senses counts for little : you know there are ever so many realities which can neither be seen nor heard nor felt, but which exist as forces, — tremendous forces. Then again you cannot mock the conviction of forty millions of people while that conviction thrills all about you like the air, — while conscious that it is pressing upon your psychical being just as the atmosphere presses upon your physical being.
Page 267 - While fully aware of the necessity for some change in policy since the coming of the Americans to Uraga, it is entirely against the interest of the country and a shame to the sacred dignity of the land to open commercial relations, to admit foreigners into the castle, to conclude a treaty, to abolish the established custom of trampling on the picture of Christ, to permit foreigners to build places of worship of their evil religion, Christianity, and to allow the three Ministers to reside in the land....
Page 30 - ... as either is regarded apart from the other. It is rather the art of representing light in shadow and shadow in light, so that the parts represented in shadow shall still CHIASTOL1TE CHICAGO 171 have the clearness and warmth of those in light, and those in light the depth and softness of those in shadow.
Page 79 - Daimy÷s or of lesser gentry entitled to travel with a retinue ; and with the commonalty, men, women and children, on foot, all with their dresses turned up for facility of movement, and for the most part taking the journey pretty easily ; frequently stopping at the numberless tea-houses or resting sheds by the way, and refreshing themselves with the simple little cup of weak green tea, and a cheery chat with whomsoever might stop like themselves to rest. It used to seem that distance was no consideration...
Page 82 - The torii was originally a perch for the fowls offered up to the gods, not as food, but to give warning of daybreak. It was erected on any side of the temple indifferently. In later times, not improbably after the introduction of Buddhism, its original meaning was forgotten ; it was placed in front only and supposed to be a gateway.
Page 266 - English and French squadrons after their victory over China were very soon expected to our coasts, and the necessity of holding conferences with different nations at the same time might cause confusion from which little else than war could be expected. These foreigners are no longer to be despised. The art of navigation, their steam-vessels, and their military and naval preparations have found full development in their hands. A war with them might result in temporary victories on our part, but when...
Page 8 - The House is composed of members returned by male Japanese subjects of not less than 25 years of age and paying a direct tax of not less than 10 yen.

Bibliographic information