Shakespeare's Third Keyboard: The Significance of Rime in Shakespeare's Plays

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University of Delaware Press, 2000 - Drama - 205 pages
"This book springs from an unaccountable gap among the rows of "Shakespeare Studies" on bookshop and library shelves. Playgoers and readers with insatiable appetites for every kind of commentary on Shakespeare's work who discover some volumes devoted to his style may find a musical metaphor illuminating: that Shakespeare had three keyboards at his disposal. The first, blank verse, and the second, prose, have attracted some critical attention; but the third, his rime (as his contemporary printers spelled it), has been neglected. This study aims to fill that gap."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
7
Part I
11
Introduction having perceived that the work was needed
13
Critical Background Still may reason warre with rime
17
Prologues Choruses and Epilogues
22
Initial Prologues
23
Midplay Choruses
25
Epilogues
27
Visions Masques and Plays within Plays
58
Masques
62
Plays within Plays
66
Unpredictable Rime
74
Couplet Soliloquies
76
Riming Episodes
80
Part II
85
Rime in Alls Well That Ends Well
87

Poems
31
Love Poems
33
Entertaining Poems
37
Catalyst Poems
39
Songs
47
Love Songs
48
Songs of Good Life
52
Rime in King Lear 1608 Quarto and 1623 Folio
142
Envoi
190
Notes
192
Works Cited
199
Index
201
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Lorna Flint was Head of the English Department at Wycombe Abbey School.

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