The Land of Promise: Being an Authentic and Impartial History of the Rise and Progress of the New British Province of South Australia ...

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Smith, Elder, 1839 - South Australia - 224 pages
 

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Page 73 - They are never awkward ; on the contrary, in manners and general intelligence they appear superior to any class of white rustics that I have seen. Their powers of mimicry seem extraordinary, and their shrewdness shines even through the medium of imperfect language, and renders them in general very agreeable companions.
Page 129 - Then answered I them, and said unto them, "The God of heaven, he will prosper us; therefore we his servants will arise and build : but ye have no portion, nor right, nor memorial, in Jerusalem.
Page 9 - To Lord Howick, says Colonel Torrens, in the introduction to his work on Colonization, belongs the honour of having been the first to give practical operation to the principle of selling the colonial lands at the disposal of the crown, and of employing the proceeds of the sale in conveying voluntary emigrants to the colonies.
Page 5 - I am not merely prepared to show," said the honourable and gallant member, " that emigration would cost less than maintaining paupers in their parishes at home, and would thus prove a measure of permanent economy and retrenchment ; I am prepared to go much further than this — I am prepared to prove both theoretically and practically, that emigration may be so conducted as to replace with interest the whole of the expenditure incurred in effecting it, and to aid the finance* of the country by opening...
Page 19 - Of the western shore of Yorke's Peninsula nothing is known, but Captain Sturt says, ' The valley of the Murray, at its entrance, cannot be less than four miles in breadth. The river does not occupy the centre, but inclines to either side, according to its windings, and thus the flats are of greater or less extent, according to the distance of the river from the base of the hills.
Page 5 - Will it be said, that England cannot do, in her colonies, that which America is doing in her western forests ? If a considerable and increasing revenue be derived from the sale of unappropriated lands in the State of Ohio, on the American side of the lakes, is it unreasonable, is it visionary, to expect that a similar revenue may be obtained from the sale of similar lands in Upper Canada, on the English side of the lakes ? In Upper Canada, the soil, the climate, and the commercial position, are little,...
Page 123 - Look on this picture and on this." the sum of 200,000/. for the purpose of founding the colony ; that is to say, for the payment of salaries, building the government-house and public offices, bridges, and other public works. This loan is secured upon the colonial revenue, and, in case that should fail, upon the land, after payment of any sum under 50,000/. which may have been borrowed upon it for the purposes of emigration. The following is an outline of the act for the better preservation of the...
Page 41 - What a land is this to which you have sent me ! The loveliness and glory of its plains' and woods, its glens and hills ! But of these you will hear from others. I cannot, however, leave it out of my estimate of God's goodness to me, that he has placed me in so fair and sweet a portion of his earth ; neither do I think it unimportant to your society.
Page 14 - Holdfast Bay, opposite to Glenelg Plains, is situate about sixty miles from Cape Jervis, on approaching which you make the " Pages," two small islands midway between the Main and Kangaroo Island. The anchorage in Holdfast Bay , (which is of the most secure description, except in westerly gales, to which it is exposed, being an open roadstead,) is in latitude 35 degrees, Mount Lofty bearing due E. by compass. The best anchorage for large ships is in five fathoms, at about three miles' distance from...

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