The European Magazine: And London Review, Volume 11

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Philological Society of London, 1787
 

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Page 78 - Beckerton, whereby I understand and know that ye be purposed to come to Topcroft in short time, and without any errand or matter but only to have a conclusion of the matter betwixt my father and you; I would be most glad of any creature alive so that the matter might grow to effect. And...
Page 359 - ... age : leave that to their care, as they know how to order every thing properly. When the time for thy marriage is come, dare not to make it without the consent of thy parents, otherwise it will have an unhappy issue.
Page 116 - Cambria's proud kings (though with reluctance) paid. Their tributary wolves ; head after head, In full account, till the woods yield no more, And all the ravenous race extinct is lost.
Page 279 - His good nurse perceived his ardent activity ; heard him mentioned as the writer of many books ; but never took it into her head that be was a great man, and rather beheld him with a kind of compassion. " You will never," said she to him one day, " be any thing but a philosopher — and what is a philosopher?
Page 359 - If thou becomest rich, do not grow insolent, nor scorn the poor ; for those very gods who deny riches to others in order to give them to thee, offended by thy pride, will take them from thee again to give to others. Support thyself by thy own labours ; for then thy food will be sweeter.
Page 155 - This is a tribute which a painter owes to an architect who composed like a painter; and was defrauded of the due reward of his merit by the wits of his time, who did not understand the principles of composition in poetry better than he; and who knew little or nothing of what he understood perfectly, the general ruling principles of architecture and painting.
Page 78 - Wherefore if that ye could be content with that good, and my poor person, I would be the merriest maiden on ground ; and if...
Page 202 - The sprightly nymph and naked grace The mazy dance together trace ; The changing year's successive plan Proclaims mortality to man ; Rough winter's blasts to spring give way, Spring yields to summer's...
Page 184 - When it rained, a fruall parqplme defended his face and wig. Thus he was always prepared to enter into any company without impropriety, or the appearance of negligence. His...
Page 197 - Books that you may carry to the fire, and hold readily in your hand, are the most useful after all.

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