Closing the Circle: Democratization and Development in Africa

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Bloomsbury Academic, 2000 - History - 180 pages
We all know that many African countries face political tyranny, failed capitalist development, and violent domestic conflict. What is less clear is what relationship may exist between effective democratic institutions and the solution of the last two problems. Richard Sandbrook draws on the experience with democratisation of a carefully selected sample of countries: Ghana, Mali and Niger in West Africa; Zambia, Tanzania and Madagascar in East Africa; and Sudan. He illustrates the diversity of African experiences of the transition to democratic political forms and the complex relationships between democratic institutions and economic reform and social order. He concludes that the ultimate value of democratic institutions lies in whether they lead to economic progress and social justice and peace.

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Contents

The Real World of African Democracy
23
Democratization and Deadly Conflict
49
Democratization and Market Reforms
75
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Richard Sandbrook is professor of political science at the University of Toronto. Among the many professional positions he has held, he has been president of the Canadian Association of African Studies (1995-96) and has served on the executive of the Canadian Council of Area Studies Learned Societies (1992-96). His books include The Politics of Africa's Economic Recovery (1993) and The Politics of Africa's Economic Stagnation (1985).
Richard Sandbrook is professor of political science at the University of Toronto. Among the many professional positions he has held, he has been president of the Canadian Association of African Studies (1995-96) and has served on the executive of the Canadian Council of Area Studies Learned Societies (1992-96). His books include The Politics of Africa's Economic Recovery (1993) and The Politics of Africa's Economic Stagnation (1985).

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