Explorations in the History of Psychology in the United States

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Josef Brožek, Josef M. Brozek
Bucknell University Press, 1984 - Psychology - 333 pages
This collection of monographs traces the development of psychology in the United States from the 1630s to the present, describing and explaining the influence of European and indigenous doctrines and methods, and chronicling the process from meager beginnings to world leadership in the field. Illustrated.

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Contents

John Dewey and J F Angell
165
E L Thorndike
167
R S Woodworth
171
W B Cannon
172
Mary W Calkins and Gordon Allport
175
G H Mead
177
Morton Prince Boris Sidis and J J Putnam
181
Overview
184

The Theory of the Mind
62
Creating a Need for Conversion
63
The Fruitless Search for God and Salvation
67
A Preface to the Operation of the Spirit in Conversion
69
The Discovery of Divine Love
73
The Psychological Basis of Spiritual Uncertainty
78
The Need for Criteria
79
Marks and Signs as Evidence
81
Solemn Inward Pain of Truth
85
Edwardss Achievement
87
The Psychological Thought of Jonathan Edwards 17031758 A Historiographical Review
97
BETWEEN THE OLD AND THE NEW PSYCHOLOGY
121
General Chronological Framework
123
Teaching at Lewisburg
125
Presidency at Lewisburg
126
The University of Rochester
127
Thinking and Writing
128
The Elements of Psychology
129
Genetic Philosophy
136
From Dualism toward Monism
139
Applying Psychology
142
Synopsis
143
ITS REVOLUTIONARY IMPACT ON AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY
148
William Jamess Psychology of Will
149
Fiat as Inhibition and Consent
151
Feelings of Innervation Refuted on Empirical Grounds
153
A Functionalist Critique of the Association of Ideas
155
The Impact on American Psychology
158
J M Baldwin
160
Conclusion
186
PIONEER PSYCHOLOGY LABORATORIES IN CLINICAL SETTINGS
196
1 Growth of Academic Laboratories
197
2 Equipment
199
3 Support
201
5 The Laboratory and Scientific Psychology
202
6 To Introspect or Not to Introspect
203
7 Laboratories in Action
205
Psychological Research in Psychiatric Settings
207
Institutional Personnel
209
Academic Personnel
226
An Overview
227
Psychological Research in the Context of Mental Deficiency
228
The Laboratory Era
230
Between the Experimental Laboratory and the Testing Room
235
The Mental Testers
253
JAMES MCKEEN CATTELL AND AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY IN THE 1920S
273
Mental Testing
276
Industrial Psychology
283
Certification of Consulting Psychologists
290
Financial Support of Child Psychology
292
The Psychological Community and E B Titchener
294
The Ninth International Congress of Psychology
295
Gestalt Psychology in America
297
Closing Comments
307
NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS
324
INDEX
327
Copyright

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Page 88 - In all demonstrative sciences the rules are certain and infallible; but when we apply them, our fallible and uncertain faculties are very apt to depart from them, and fall into error.
Page 154 - Consider what effects, that might conceivably have practical bearings, we conceive the object of our conception to have. Then, our conception of these effects is the whole of our conception of the object.
Page 19 - After God had carried us safe to New England, and we had builded our houses, provided necessaries for our livelihood, reared convenient places for God's worship, and settled the civil government, one of the next things we longed for and looked after was to advance learning and perpetuate it to posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate ministry to the churches, when our present ministers shall lie in the dust.
Page 152 - In other words, those races of beings only can have survived in which, on the average, agreeable or desired feelings went along with activities conducive to the maintenance of life, while disagreeable and habitually-avoided feelings went along with activities directly or indirectly destructive of life...
Page 66 - LORD give me Salvation ! I PRAY, BEG pardon all my Sins! When the Child had done Prayer, she came out of the Closet, and came and sat down by her Mother, and cried out aloud. Her Mother very earnestly asked her several times, what the matter was, before she would make any Answer; but she continued exceedingly crying, and wreathing her Body to and fro, like one in Anguish of Spirit.
Page 64 - Persons are first awakened with a sense of their miserable condition by nature, the danger they are in of perishing eternally, and that it is of great importance to them that they speedily escape, and get into a better state. Those...
Page 190 - To attain perfect clearness in our thoughts of an object, then, we need only consider what conceivable effects of a practical kind the object may involve — what sensations we are to expect from it, and what reactions we must prepare.
Page 69 - The will, and the affections of the soul, are not two faculties; the affections are not essentially distinct from the will, nor do they differ from the mere actings of the will, and inclination of the soul, but only in the liveliness and sensibleness of exercise.
Page 75 - So this new spiritual sense is not a new faculty of understanding, but it is a new foundation laid in the nature of the soul, for a new kind of exercises of the same faculty of understanding.
Page 72 - This faculty is called by various names: it is sometimes called the inclination; and, as it has respect to the actions that are determined and governed by it, is called the will; and the mind, with regard to the exercises of this faculty, is often called the heart.

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