A Dictionary, Geographical, Statistical, and Historical, of the Various Countries, Places, and Principal Natural Objects in the World, Volume 1

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1854 - Geography
 

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Page 201 - And eloquence, native to famous wits Or hospitable, in her sweet recess, City or suburban, studious walks and shades. See there the olive grove of Academe, Plato's retirement, where the Attic bird Trills her thick-warbled notes the summer long; There flowery hill Hymettus, with the sound Of bees...
Page 224 - Their eyelids are always half closed, to keep the flies out of their eyes, they being so troublesome here, that no fanning will keep them from coming to one's face; and without the assistance of both hands to keep them off, they will creep into one's nostrils, and mouth too, if the lips are not shut very close...
Page 201 - Artaxerxes' throne. To sage Philosophy next lend thine ear, From Heaven descended to the low-roofed house Of Socrates — see there his tenement — Whom, well inspired, the oracle pronounced Wisest of men; from whose mouth issued forth Mellifluous streams, that watered all the schools Of Academics old and new, with those Surnamed Peripatetics, and the sect Epicurean and the Stoic severe.
Page 80 - Over a million and a half of square leagues, from Cape Horn to the river St. Lawrence and Behring's Straits, we are struck at the first glance with the general resemblance in the features of the inhabitants. We think we perceive them all to be descended from the some stock, notwithstanding the prodigious diversity of their languages.
Page 14 - Afghauns in a few words ; their vices are revenge, envy, avarice, rapacity, and obstinacy ; on the other hand, they are fond of liberty, faithful to their friends, kind to their dependents, hospitable, brave, hardy, frugal, laborious, and prudent ; and they are less disposed than the nations in their neighbourhood to falsehood, intrigue, and deceit.
Page 201 - Of bees' industrious murmur, oft invites To studious musing; there Ilissus rolls His whispering stream; within the walls then view The schools of ancient sages; his who bred Great Alexander to subdue the world, Lyceum there, and painted Stoa next...
Page 110 - ... legs along the ground. The holes serve as steps, without which the precipices would be in a great measure impracticable ; but should the creature happen to set its foot between two of these holes or not place it right, the rider falls, and if on the side of the precipice, inevitably perishes.
Page 110 - The address of these creatures is here truly wonderful ; for, in this rapid motion, when they seem to have lost all government of themselves, they follow exactly the different windings of the road, as if they had...
Page 211 - Immediately previous to the discovery of the route to India by the Cape of Good Hope, we find that the price of pepper in the markets of Europe had fallen to 6s.
Page 51 - From that time, like everything else which falls into the hands of the Mussulman, it has been going to ruin, and the discovery of the passage to India by the Cape of Good Hope gave the deathblow to its commercial greatness.

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