Typhoon and Other Tales

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Oxford University Press, 2002 - Fiction - 242 pages
This volume contains "Typhoon," "The Secret Sharer," "Falk," and "Amy Foster." "Typhoon," a story of a steamship and her crew beset by a tempest, is a masterpiece of descriptive virtuosity and moral irony, while "The Secret Sharer" excels in symbolic ambiguity. Both stories vividly present Conrad's abiding preoccupation with the theme of solidarity, challenged from without by the elements and from within by human doubts and fears.
Conrad's experiences as a captain of the ship Otago in 1888 provided material for both "The Secret Sharer" and "Falk." "Amy Foster," written in 1901, is bleak and stark in its depiction of human isolation and incomprehension.
In a range of tones extending from the sombre to the radiant, Conrad's central preoccupations are displayed at their best, strangest, and most plangent in this selection of stories.
 

Contents

General Editors Preface
vii
Note on the Text
xxxiv
A Chronology of Joseph Conrad
xliii
TYPHOON I
3
Extract from the Authors Note 1919
218
Glossary
233
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Joseph Conrad is recognized as one of the 20th century's greatest English language novelists. He was born Jozef Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski on December 3, 1857, in the Polish Ukraine. His father, a writer and translator, was from Polish nobility, but political activity against Russian oppression led to his exile. Conrad was orphaned at a young age and subsequently raised by his uncle. At 17 he went to sea, an experience that shaped the bleak view of human nature which he expressed in his fiction. In such works as Lord Jim (1900), Youth (1902), and Nostromo (1904), Conrad depicts individuals thrust by circumstances beyond their control into moral and emotional dilemmas. His novel Heart of Darkness (1902), perhaps his best known and most influential work, narrates a literal journey to the center of the African jungle. This novel inspired the acclaimed motion picture Apocalypse Now. After the publication of his first novel, Almayer's Folly (1895), Conrad gave up the sea. He produced thirteen novels, two volumes of memoirs, and twenty-eight short stories. He died on August 3, 1924, in England.

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