Deep South: A Social Anthropological Study of Caste and Class

Front Cover
Univ of South Carolina Press, 2009 - History - 557 pages
First published in 1941, Deep South is the cooperative effort of a team of social anthropologists to document the economic, racial, and cultural character of the Jim Crow South through a study of a representative rural Mississippi community. Researchers Allison Davis, Burleigh B. Gardner, and Mary R. Gardner lived among the people of Natchez, Mississippi, as they investigated how class and caste informed daily life in a typical southern community. This Southern Classics edition of their study offers contemporary students of history a provocative collection of primary material gathered by conscientious and well-trained participant-observers, who found thenas nowintertwined social and economic inequalities at the root of racial tensions.

Expanding on earlier studies of community stratification by social class, researchers in the Deep South Project introduced the additional concept of caste, which parsed a community through rigid social ranks assigned at birth and unalterable through lifea concept readily identifiable in the racial divisions of the Jim Crow South. As African American researchers, Davis and his wife, Elizabeth, along with his assistant St. Clair Drake, were able to gain unrivaled access to the black community in rural Mississippi, unavailable to their white counterparts. Through their interviews and experiences, the authors vividly capture the nuances in caste-enforcing systems of tenant-landlord relations, local government, and law enforcement. But the chief achievement of Deep South is its rich analysis of how the southern economic system, and sharecropping in particular, functioned to maintain rigid caste divisions along racial lines.

In the new introduction tothis edition, Jennifer Jensen Walla

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Deep Southa Social Anthropological Study of Caste and Class W Lloyd Warner
3
The System of ColorCastes
15
The Class System of the White Caste
59
The White UpperClass Family
84
The White MiddleClass Family
100
The White LowerClass Family
118
Social Cliques in the White Society
137
la Social characteristics of a sample of 43 white participation
152
Distribution of tenants among landlords by production
310
Average yield per acre by production groups and soilareas
318
Division of Labor in the Cotton Economy
324
Financing the Production of Cotton
343
Income from Cotton
359
Distribution of owners and cash tenants by production
361
How the Negro Tenant Lives
378
Intimidation of Labor
392

Age distribution of the uppermiddleclass and lowermiddle
162
Social Mobility within the White Caste
171
Social Cliques in the Colored Society
208
The Class System of the Colored Caste
228
PART II
253
General View of the Economic System
255
Leading fields of employment in Old County by color
258
Caste Class and the Control of Land
276
Economic Groups and the Control of Land
300
Production groups 192832 inclusive in A A A sample
303
The Plantation in Its Social Setting
401
Caste Class and the Urban Economy
422
Analysis of income groups of workers in Old City
430
Hourly wage rates in Old City planingmill by color
436
Relation between the Caste System and the Economic System
454
White Power
483
Caste and Class
539
Index
541
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Jennifer Jensen Wallach is an assistant professor of history at Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville and the author of Closer to the Truth Than Any Fact: Memoir, Memory, and Jim Crow.

Bibliographic information