The Influence of the Carnegie, Ford, and Rockefeller Foundations on American Foreign Policy: The Ideology of Philanthropy

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1983 - Endowments - 227 pages
This book examines the generally unrecognized role played by the Carnegie, Ford, and Rockefeller foundations in support of United States foreign policy, particularly since 1945. The foundations' efforts on behalf of American interests abroad have focused primarily on their support for a number of institutions of higher education in strategically located Third World nations. These institutions, modeled after foundation-supported American universities, were designed to train Third World leaders in norms that would encourage them--minimally--to assume a posture of neutrality toward American economic and political penetration of their societies.

Dr. Berman's study challenges the oft-asserted, but undocumented, thesis of the American political right that these liberal foundations historically have pursued policies detrimental to United States interests. The evidence indicates how foundation policies and programs were formulated after close consultation with leaders of the American corporate sector and government officials, and how their activities were designed to further the objectives determined by those who influence the direction of United States foreign policy.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Foundations and the Extension of American Hegemony
9
The Control of Culture
10
The Origins and Ideology of Modern Philanthropy
13
Some Early Foundation Programs
16
On Analyzing the Foundations Hegemony
24
Foundation Managers Their Money and Their Influence
30
The Foundations in Perspective
35
United States Foreign Policy and the Evolution of the Foundations Overseas Programs 19451960
39
The Growth of International and AreaStudies Programs after 1945
98
Foundation Support for the Social Sciences
103
The Social Scientists View of Development
109
The Consensus on ThirdWorld Development
116
The Outcomes and Implications of Sponsored Developmental Theory
119
Foundation Influence on Intermediate Organizations International Forums and Research
125
Foundation Support for Outside Organizations
127
The AfricanAmerican Institute
129

The Evolving Foreign Policy Consensus
41
Continued Access to Sources of Raw Materials
44
Evolutionary Change versus Revolutionary Chaos
46
Mechanisms to Implement the WarPeace Studies Projects Conclusions
48
The World Bank
49
Bilateral Aid
50
The Basis for the Foundations Overseas Programs after 1945
53
The Direction of the Foundations Overseas Programs
57
Foundation Programs and ForeignPolicy Determination
60
The Implementation of Foundation Programs in the Third World
65
Support for Lead Universities in Developing Nations
67
Foundation Work in Nigeria
73
Foundation Support for the University of East Africa
74
The Growth of Social Science in ThirdWorld Universities
77
Programs in Public Administration
83
Teacher Education Projects
86
The Foundations and Foreign Students
91
Forging an Intellectual Network
94
The Foundations Define a Field Foreign Area Studies Social Science and Developmental Theory
97
Agencies to Coordinate American Universities International Activities
131
Education and World Affairs
134
Agencies to Coordinate the Foundations Developmental Strategies
135
Overseas Development Council
138
Support for Propaganda Organizations
141
Foundation Support for International Conferences and Studies
143
The Bellagio Conferences on ThirdWorld Development
147
Foundation Sponsorship of Independent Research
150
The Extension of the Foundations Hegemony
155
Technocracy Cultural Capital and Foundation Programs
159
Technocracy as a Developmental Panacea
161
Program Evaluation and the Technocratic Strategy
164
Foundations and the Reproduction and Control of Cultural Capital
167
The Foundations as Class Institutions
172
On the Contradictions of Liberal Philanthropy
175
Notes
179
Index
217
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1983)

Edward H. Berman is Professor of Foundations of Education at the University of Louisville.

Bibliographic information