The Terror That Comes in the Night: An Experience-Centered Study of Supernatural Assault Traditions

Front Cover
University of Pennsylvania Press, Incorporated, Sep 1, 1989 - Social Science - 304 pages
11 Reviews

David Hufford's work exploring the experiential basis for belief in the supernatural, focusing here on the so-called Old Hag experience, a psychologically disturbing event in which a victim claims to have encountered some form of malign entity while dreaming (or awake). Sufferers report feeling suffocated, held down by some "force," paralyzed, and extremely afraid.

The experience is surprisingly common: the author estimates that approximately 15 percent of people undergo this event at some point in their lives. Various cultures have their own name for the phenomenon and have constructed their own mythology around it; the supernatural tenor of many Old Hag stories is unavoidable. Hufford, as a folklorist, is well-placed to investigate this puzzling occurrence.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
5
3 stars
4
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: The Terror That Comes in the Night: An Experience-Centered Study of Supernatural Assault Traditions: Experience-centred Study of Supernatural Assault ... of The American Folklore Society)

User Review  - Goodreads

A really good source if your looking for information on sleep paralysis, especially in how it relates to folklore. Also interesting was his remarks on the study of supernatural phenomena or lack ... Read full review

Review: The Terror That Comes in the Night: An Experience-Centered Study of Supernatural Assault Traditions: Experience-centred Study of Supernatural Assault ... of The American Folklore Society)

User Review  - Goodreads

A mesmerizing, seminal work in sleep paralysis research. Read full review

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1989)

David J. Hufford is Professor and Director at the Doctors Kienle Center for Humanistic Medicine at the Penn State College of Medicine (Hershey), where he has appointments in Medical Humanities, Behavioral Science, and Family and Community Medicine. He is Adjunct Professor in the Program of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

Bibliographic information