A Grammar of the English Language

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E.H. Butler & Company, 1864 - English language - 199 pages

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Page 172 - How lov'd, how honour'd once, avails thee not, To whom related, or by whom begot ; A heap of dust alone remains of thee, 'Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall be ! Poets themselves must fall, like those they sung, Deaf the prais'd ear, and mute the tuneful tongue.
Page 138 - Withhold not good from them to whom it is due, when it is in the power of thine hand to do it.
Page 150 - Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them...
Page 167 - And it came to pass at noon that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud : for he is a god ; either he is talking or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.
Page 168 - I seem to myself to behold this city, the ornament of the earth, and the capital of all nations, suddenly involved in one conflagration. I see before me the slaughtered heaps of citizens, lying unburied in the midst of their ruined country. The furious countenance of Cethegus rises to my view, while with a savage joy, he is triumphing in your miseries.
Page 172 - tis madness to defer: Next day the fatal precedent will plead ; Thus on, till wisdom is push'd out of life. Procrastination is the thief of time ; Year after year it steals, till all are fled, And to the mercies of a moment leaves The vast concerns of an eternal scene.
Page 154 - For the woman which hath an husband is bound by the law to her husband so long as he liveth; but if the husband be dead, she is loosed from the law of her husband.
Page 178 - Oh night, And storm, and darkness, ye are wondrous strong, Yet lovely in your strength, as is the light Of a dark eye in woman...
Page 159 - Caravan, complaisant, violin, repartee, referee, privateer, domineer," may all have the greater stress on the first, and the less on the last syllable, without any violent offence to the ear : nay, it may be asserted, that the principal accent on the first syllable of these words, and none at all on the last, though certainly improper, has nothing in it grating or discordant ; but placing an accent on the second syllable of these words would entirely derange them, and produce great harshness and...
Page 139 - And he bearing his cross went forth into a place called the place of a skull, which is called in the Hebrew Golgotha: 18. Where they crucified him, and two others with him, on either side one. and Jesus in the midst.

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