Who Gets What?: Analysing Economic Inequality in Australia

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Sep 17, 2007 - Political Science
This 2007 book addresses important contemporary concerns about social justice. It presents detailed economic evidence, but analyses it in a manner that is engaging and readily accessible to the non-specialist reader. Who Gets What? examines what has been happening to incomes and wealth in Australia, what causes increased economic inequality, and the possibility of creating a more egalitarian society. It looks at who is rich, which social groups are still in poverty, and the policies that could redistribute income and wealth more effectively.
 

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Contents

Current income distribution
30
Chapter Three
44
Analysing the wealth of the nation
46
Overall ownership of wealth
48
How concentrated is wealth?
49
Its in the bank
52
Wealth in superannuation
54
Property is wealth
55
Chapter Eight
148
Inequality as business as usual
149
Neoliberalism
153
Employment and industrial relations
156
Whose choices?
158
Discrimination
161
Conclusion
168
Chapter Nine
169

Inheriting wealth
57
the dark side of wealth?
60
Chapter Four
64
The wealth of the wealthy
67
Conclusion
78
Chapter Five
79
absolute or relative?
80
Multidimensional poverty and
84
Is poverty declining or growing?
86
Poverty and age
89
in poverty
92
Solo poverty
95
Indigenous peoples poverty
96
Immigrants and refugees in poverty
98
Poverty among people with
101
Chapter Six
104
Urban inequality
105
Regional dynamics
118
Chapter Seven
126
Socialisation or rational choice?
137
Conclusion
147
Dont worry be happy
170
Income and happiness
172
Income inequality and happiness
176
Conclusion
183
Chapter Ten
184
Economic impacts
185
Social impacts
190
Political impacts
194
Environmental impacts
196
Inequality and public health
197
Conclusion
199
Chapter Eleven
200
Do it yourself?
201
A national land tax?
207
Getting to the source
210
Guaranteed minimum income?
214
Jobs for all
217
Dealing with discrimination
220
Chapter Twelve
223
Perpetuating inequality
224

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 16 - Australian Government Commission of Inquiry into Poverty. (Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, 1975.) Pp.
Page 9 - The Spreading Net: Age and gender in the process of casualisation in Australia', Journal of Australian Political Economy, no.

About the author (2007)

Frank Stilwell is a Professor of Political Economy at the University of Sydney.

Kirrily Jordan is a research assistant in the discipline of Political Economy at the University of Sydney.

Bibliographic information