Analytical and Practical Grammar: A Practical Grammar of the English Language : with Analysis of Sentences

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Sheldon, 1870 - English language - 336 pages

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Page 182 - In My Father's house are many mansions; if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you to Myself; that where I am, there you may be also.
Page 288 - The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea, The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and to me. Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight, And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight, And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds...
Page 281 - So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality ; then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. 0 death, where is thy sting ? 0 grave, where is thy victory ? The sting of death is sin ; and the strength of sin is the Law. But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.
Page 79 - Honour the Lord with thy substance, and with the firstfruits of all thine increase: so shall thy barns be filled with plenty, and thy presses shall burst out with new wine.
Page 274 - A Brute arrives at a point of Perfection that he can never pass. In a few Years he has all the Endowments he is capable of, and were he to live ten thousand more, would be the same thing he is at present.
Page 281 - Near yonder copse, where once the garden smiled, And still where many a garden -flower grows wild; There, where a few torn shrubs the place disclose, The village preacher's modest mansion rose. A man he was to all the country dear, And passing rich with forty pounds a year...
Page 271 - Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them...
Page 292 - The lambs with wolves shall graze the verdant mead, And boys in flowery bands the tiger lead; The steer and lion at one crib shall meet, And harmless serpents lick the pilgrim's feet.
Page 282 - To sit on rocks, to muse o'er flood and fell, To slowly trace the forest's shady scene, Where things that own not man's dominion dwell, And mortal foot hath ne'er or rarely been ; To climb the trackless mountain all unseen, With the wild flock that never needs a fold; Alone o'er steeps and foaming falls to lean ; This is not solitude ; 'tis but to hold Converse with nature's charms...
Page 3 - English Grammar is the art of speaking and writing the English language with propriety.

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