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LOVE FOR OUR NATIVE LAND.

9

Frown at effeminates, whose very looks
Reflect dishonour on the land I love.
How, in the name of soldiership and sense,
Should England prosper, when such things, as smooth
And tender as a girl, all-essenced o'er
With odours, and as profligate as sweet;
Who sell their laurel for a myrtle wreath,
And love when they should fight; when such as these
Presume to lay their hand upon the ark
Of her magnificent and awful cause ?
Time was when it was praise and boast enough
In erery clime; and travel where we might,
That we were born her children. Praise enough
To fill the ambition of a private man,
That Chatham's language was his mother tongue,
And Wolfe’s great name compatriot with his own.
Farewell those honours, and farewell with them
The hope of such hereafter! They have fallen
Each in his field of glory ; one in arms,
And one in council— Wolfe upon the lap
Of smiling Victory that moment won,
And Chatham, heart-sick of his country's shame!
They made us many soldiers. Chatham, still
Consulting England's happiness at home,
Secur'd it by an unforgiving frown,
If any wrong'd her. Wolfe, where'er he fought,
Put so much of his heart into his act,
That his example had a magnet's force,
And all were swift to follow whom all loved.
Those suns are set. Oh rise some other such !
Or all that we have left is empty talk
Of old achievements and despair of new.

Corper.

RECOLLECTIONS OF SCHOOLDAYS.

Be it a weakness, it deserves some praise,
We love the play-place of our early days ;
The scene is touching, and the heart is stone
That feels not at that sight, and feels at none.

The wall on which we tried our graving skill,
The very name we carved subsisting still;
The bench on which we sat while deep employ'd,
Though mangled, hack'd, and hew'd, not yet destroy'd;
The little ones, unbutton'd, glowing hot,
Playing our games, and on the very spot;
As happy as we once, to kneel and draw
The chalky ring, and knuckle down at taw;
To pitch the ball into the grounded hat,
Or drive it devious with a dexterous pat;
The pleasing spectacle at once excites
Such recollections of our own delights,
That, viewing it, we seem almost to obtain
Our innocent sweet simple years again.
This fond attachment to the well-known place,
Whence first we started into life's long race,
Maintains its hold with such unfailing sway,
We feel it e'en in age, and at our latest day.
Hark! how the sire of chits, whose future share
Of classic food begins to be his care,
With his own likeness placed on either knee,
Indulges all a father's heartfelt glee;
And tells them, as he strokes their silver locks,
That they must soon learn Latin, and to box;
Then turning, he regales his listening wife
With all the adventures of his early life;
His skill in coachmanship, or driving chaise,
In bilking tavern-bills, and spouting plays;
What shifts he used, detected in a scrape,
How he was flogg'd, or had the luck to escape ;
What sums he lost at play, and how he sold
Watch, seals, and all-till all his pranks are told.
Retracing thus his frolics, ('tis a name
That palliates deeds of folly and of shame,)
He gives the local bias all its sway;
Resolves that where he play'd, his sons shall play
And destines their bright genius to be shown
Just in the scene where he display'd his own.
The meek and bashful boy will soon be taught
To be as bold and forward as he nught;
The rude will scuffle through with ease enough,
Great schools suit best the sturdy and the rough.

RECOLLECTIONS OF SCHOOLDAYS.

11

Ah, happy designation, prudent choice,
The event is sure ; expect it, and rejoice !
Soon see your wish fulfilled in either child,
The pert made perter, and the tame made wild.

Cowper.

THE MORNING DREAM.

'Twas in the glad season of spring,

Asleep at the dawn of the day,
I dream'd what I cannot but sing,

So pleasant it seemed as I lay.
I dream'd that, on ocean afloat,

Far hence to the westward I saild,
While the billows high lifted the boat,

And the fresh-blowing breeze never faild.
In the steerage a woman

I

saw,
Such at least was the form that she wore,
Whose beauty impress’d me with awe,

Ne'er taught me by woman before.
She sat, and a shield at her side

Shed light, like a sun on the waves,
And smiling divinely, she cried-

'I go to make freemen of slaves.'
Then, raising her voice to a strain

The sweetest that ear ever heard,
She sung of the slave's broken chain, .

Wherever her glory appeared.
Some clouds, which had over us hung,

Fled, chased by her melody clear,
And methought while she liberty sung,

'Twas liberty only to hear.
Thus swiftly dividing the flood,

To a slave-cultured island we came,
Where a demon, her enemy,

stood-
Oppression his terrible name.
In his hand, as the sign of his sway,

A.scourge hung with lashes he bore,
And stood looking out for his prey

From Africa's sorrowful shore.

But soon as, approaching the land,

That goddess-like woman he view'd,
The scourge he let fall from his hand,

With blood of his subjects imbrued.
I saw him both sicken and die,

And, the moment the monster expired,
Heard shouts, that ascended the sky,

From thousands with rapture inspired.
Awaking, how could I but muce

At what such a dream should betide ?
But soon my ear caught the glad news,

Which served my weak thought for a guide;
That Britannia, renown'd o'er the waves

For the hatred she ever has shown
To the black-sceptred rulers of slaves,

Resolves to have none of her own. Cowper.

THE CONVERSATION OF THE TWO DISCIPLES

GOING TO EMMAUS.

It happen'd on a solemn eventide,
Soon after He that was our surety died,
Two bosom friends, each pensively inclined,
The scene of all those sorrows left behind,
Sought their own village, busied as they went
In musings worthy of the great event:
They spake of Him they loved, of Him whose life,
Though blameless, had incurr'd perpetual strife,
Whose deeds had left, in spite of hostile arts,
A deep memorial graven on their hearts.
The recollection, like a vein of ore,
The farther traced, enrich'd them still the more ;
They thought Him, and they justly thought Him, one
Sent to do more than he appear'd to have done ;
To exalt a people, and to place them high
Above all else, and wonder'd He should die.
Ere yet they brought their journey to an end,
A stranger join'd them, courteous as a friend,

CONVERSATION OF THE TWO DISCIPLES,

13

And ask'd them, with a kind engaging air,
What their affliction was, and begg'd a share.
Inform’d, he gather'd up the broken thread,
And, truth and wisdom gracing all he said,
Explain’d, illustrated, and search'd so well
The tender theme on which they chose to dwell,
That, reaching home, the night, they said, is near,
We must not now be parted, sojourn here-
The new acquaintance soon became a guest,
And made so welcome at their simple feast,
He bless'd the bread, but vanish'd at the word,
And left them both exclaiming, “ 'Twas the Lord !
Did not our hearts feel all He deigned to say,
Did not they burn within us by the way ? '

Now theirs was converse, such as it behoves
Man maintain, and such as God approves :
Their views indeed were indistinct and dim,
But yet successful, being aim'd at Him.
Christ and His character their only scope,
Their object, and their subject, and their hope,
They felt what it became them much to feel,
And, wanting Him to loose the sacred seal,
Found Him as prompt, as their desire was true,
To spread the new-born glories in their view.
Well—what are ages and the lapse of time
Match'd against truths, as lasting as sublime ?

The works of man inherit, as is just,
Their author's frailty, and return to dust:
But truth divine for ever stands secure,
Its head is guarded as its base is sure ;
Fix'd in the rolling flood of endless years,
The pillar of the eternal plan appears,
The raving storm and dashing wave defies,
Built by that Architect who built the skies.

Corper.

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