To Save Humanity: What Matters Most for a Healthy Future

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Oxford University Press, May 1, 2015 - Medical - 392 pages
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"The UN was not created to take mankind to heaven, but to save humanity from hell." --Dag Hammarskjöld, United Nations Secretary-General 1953-1961 The turn of the 21st century was an objective low point in the history of human health: AIDS was scourging Africa, millions of women died each year in child birth, and billions suffered under malnourishment and poverty. In response, the United Nations launched its Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), an ambitious charter that since 2000 has measurably reduced the worldwide burdens of poverty, hunger, and disease. With the MDGs set to expire in 2015, continued progress on these fronts is anything but certain. In addition to the persisting threats of the 20th century, globalization has sped the development of new threats--pandemics, climate change, chronic disease--that now threaten rich and poor countries equally. "To Save Humanity" is a collection of short, honest essays on what single issue matters most for the future of global health. Authored by the world's leading voices from science, politics, and social advocacy, this collection is both a primer on the major issues of our time and a potential blueprint for post-2015 health and development. This unparalleled collection will provide illuminating and thought-provoking reading for anyone invested in our collective future and well-being.
 

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Contents

1 Harnessing Womens Agency
1
2 Democratizing International Development
5
3 Systems Thinking
9
4 Leadership for Health Equity
13
5 Why Universal Health Coverage?
17
6 Governance and Leadership for Health
21
7 Prioritizing Vulnerable Populations
25
8 The New Health Journalism
29
51 Technology and Health Care in Africa
183
52 Love Is the Cure
187
53 MultiSectoral Investments for Health
191
54 Secondary Schooling for Girls
195
55 Getting Health Delivery Right
197
56 Closing the Pain Divide
201
57 Equity in Child Survival
205
58 EvidenceInformed Health Systems
209

9 VaccinesAccelerating Access for All
33
10 Improving Health by Addressing Poverty
37
11 Biosocial Education for All
39
12 City Leadership on Climate Change
43
13 Health Is Not Alone
47
14 Education First
51
15 Pandemics OneTwoThree Punch
55
16 Equality is the Future
59
17 Prioritizing Health in Politics
63
18 Committing to Unbridled Collaboration
67
19 A New Philanthropy
71
20 Climates Big Health Warning
75
21 Tackling Obesity and Overweight
79
22 Preventing Premature Deaths
81
23 HIV Treatment a Moral Duty
85
24 The Power of Science
89
25 Whose Life Is It?
93
26 Security for Our Shared Home
97
27 The Drugs Dont Work
99
28 Vision 2020and Beyond
103
29 Achieving Social Equity
107
30 HealthCare Financing and Social Justice
109
31 A Global CDC and FDA
113
32 A Universal Flu Vaccine
117
33 Accountability Is One Big Idea
119
34 The Power of Knowledge
121
35 Better Information Will Save Lives
125
36 Communicable Before Noncommunicable Diseases
127
37 HumanCentered Design
131
38 A Data Revolution in Health
135
39 NonDrug Interventions Also Work
139
40 Investing in Health Outcomes
143
41 Imagining Global Health with Justice
145
42 Putting People First
149
43 The Big Health Data Future
153
44 Standing Up to Big Tobacco
157
45 Safe Food and Medical Products
161
46 Climate Change Is Here
165
47 A Convenient DefenseDefining Affordability
169
48 A Science of Global Strategy
173
49 Time for Renewal
177
50 Reliable Unbiased Reproducible Evidence
179
59 Ignorance about Causes of Death
213
60 Five Pillars of Wisdom
217
61 Keeping the Promise to Children
221
62 Embracing Community Innovation
225
63 Fairness and Health Equity
229
64 Medicines Must Be Safer
233
65 From Hegemony to Partnership
237
66 Health in the Global Economy
241
67 Disability and a Healthy Society
245
68 Fusion Fund for Health
247
69 Health and Not Health Care
251
70 Diet for a Healthy Future
253
71 Global Social Protection in Health
257
72 Inequities in Adolescent Health
261
73 Sharing Financial Responsibilities
263
74 Were All in This Together
267
75 No Health without Rights
271
76 No Magic Bullet
275
77 The Health Impact Fund
277
78 ValueBased HealthCare Delivery
281
79 Acknowledging Ignorance
283
80 Universal IdeasLocal Institutions
285
81 From Pulse to Planet
287
82 A War on Tuberculosis
291
83 Universal Health Coverage
295
84 Regulating Antimicrobials
297
85 Who Will Lead?
301
86 The Rwandan Consensus
305
87 Ending Preventable Child Death
309
88 Transformative Leadership
313
89 Global Health Citizenship
317
90 Harmonizing Health
321
91 Public Health 20
325
92 Tax Reform
329
93 Investing in a Grand Convergence
333
94 Health in a Multipolar World
337
95 Midwives Save Womens Lives
341
96 Smart Data
345
Books Recommended by Contributors
349
Index
353
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About the author (2015)

Julio Frenk, MD, MPH, PhD, is Dean of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and T&G Angelopoulos Professor of Public Health & International Development. He is an eminent authority on global health who served as the Assistant Director-General of the World Health Organization and Senior Fellow of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He received the Clinton Global Citizen Award for changing "the way practitioners and policy makers across the world think about health." Steven J. Hoffman, BHSc, MA, JD, is an Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Global Strategy Lab at the University of Ottawa, Visiting Assistant Professor of Global Health at Harvard University, and Assistant Professor of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics (Part-Time) at McMaster University. He previously worked for the Ontario Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care, World Health Organization and the Executive Office of the United Nations Secretary-General.

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