The Microscope: Its History, Construction, and Applications

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H. Ingram and Company, 1856 - Microscope and microscopy - 457 pages
 

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Page 458 - Webster's Dictionary of the English Language, Exhibiting the Origin, Orthography, Pronunciation, and Definitions of Words. Abridged from the Quarto Edition of the Author. To which are added a Synopsis of Words differently Pronounced by different Orthoepists ; and Walker's Key to the Classical Pronunciation of Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper Names.
Page 180 - ... around. The beauty and novelty of such a scene in the animal kingdom long arrested my attention, but, after twenty-five minutes' of constant observation, I was obliged to withdraw my eye from fatigue, without having seen the torrent for one instant change its direction, or diminish in the slightest degree the rapidity of its course.
Page 451 - Has swept at once th' unbounded scheme of things; Mark'd their dependance so, and firm accord, As with unfaltering accent to conclude That this availeth nought ? Has any seen The mighty chain of beings, lessening down From Infinite Perfection to the brink Of dreary nothing...
Page 336 - This is dispensed ; and what surmounts the reach Of human sense I shall delineate so, By likening spiritual to corporal forms, As may express them best ; though what if earth Be but the shadow of heaven, and things therein Each to other like, more than on earth is thought...
Page 177 - All these things live and remain for ever for all uses, and they are all obedient. •• .•- * ' ."..... JIT. All things are double one against another : and he .hath made nothing imperfect.
Page 141 - While sailing a little south of the Plata on one very dark night, the sea presented a wonderful and most beautiful spectacle. There was a fresh breeze, and every part of the surface, which during the day is seen as foam, now glowed with a pale light. The vessel drove before her bows two billows of liquid phosphorus, and in her wake she was followed by a milky train. As far as the eye reached, the crest of every wave was bright, and the sky above the horizon, from the reflected glare of these livid...
Page 176 - Consider their incredible numbers, their universal distribution, their insatiable voracity; and that it is the particles of decaying vegetable and animal bodies which they are appointed to devour and assimilate. Surely we must in some degree be indebted to those ever active invisible scavengers for the salubrity of our atmosphere.
Page 218 - ... had become thin and flattened like a pancake. All communication between the inferior portion of the stomach and the mouth was of course prevented ; yet, instead of emaciating and dying of an atrophy, the animal had availed itself of what...
Page 359 - Now, each of these pores being the aperture of a little tube of about a quarter of an inch long, it follows that in a square inch of skin on the palm of the hand there exists a length of tube equal to 882 inches, or 73^ feet.
Page 235 - ... invisible. These animals are of a great variety of shapes and sizes, and in such prodigious numbers, that, in a short time, the whole surface of the rock appears to be alive and in motion. The most common...

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