A-Morphous Morphology

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 25, 1992 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 434 pages
In A-Morphous Morphology, Stephen Anderson presents a theory of word structure which relates to a full generative grammar of language. He holds word structure to be the result of interacting principles from a number of grammatical areas, and thus not localized in a single morphological component. Dispensing with classical morphemes, the theory instead treats morphology as a matter of rule-governed relations, minimizing the non-phonological internal structure assigned to words and eliminating morphologically motivated boundary elements. Professor Anderson makes the further claim that the properties of individual lexical items are not visible to, or manipulated by, the rules of the syntax, and assimilates to morphology special clitic phenomena. A-Morphous Morphology maintains significant distinctions between inflection, derivation, and compounding, in terms of their place ina grammar. It also contains discussion of the implications of this new A-Morphous position analysis of word structure.

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Contents

The study of word structure
7
11 How are words composed?
9
12 The nature of words
17
Why have a morphology at all?
22
21 Morphology and syntax in Kukalu
23
22 Morphology vs syntax in general
37
23 Morphology vs phonology
42
24 Conclusion
47
83 Clitics as phraselevel morphology
210
84 The formal expression of clitic placement
216
85 Conclusions
221
The relation of morphology to phonology
224
91 Boundary elements in phonological theory
227
92 The interaction of morphology and phonology
249
93 Conclusion
255
How much structure do words have?
256

Is morphology really about morphemes?
48
32 Classical problems with morphemes
51
33 Generalizing the structure of the morpheme
56
34 Items vs processes in morphology
59
35 Wordbased vs morphemebased morphology
69
36 Conclusion
71
The interaction of morphology and syntax
73
41 What is inflection?
74
42 Morphosyntactic Representations
85
43 Conclusion
100
The theory of inflection
102
51 Agreement
103
52 The assignment of configurational properties
118
53 Deriving the phonological form of inflected words
122
54 Conclusion
135
Some complex inflectional systems
136
61 Georgian Verb agreement
137
62 Potawatomi inflectional morphology
156
summary of Potawatomi inflectional rules
177
Morphology in the lexicon derivation
180
72 Derivational rules
184
73 Productivity and lexicalization
195
74 Conclusion
197
Clitics are phrasal affixes
198
81 The nature of clitics
199
82 The nature of affixes
205
102 Possible motivations for wordinternal structure
261
103 Conclusion
290
Composites words with internal structure
292
111 Compounds and their structure
294
112 Generalizing the notion of compound
299
113 Wordinternal structure and theories of the lexicon
305
114 The notion head of a word
310
115 Summary and conclusion
318
Morphology and the typology of languages
320
122 Sapirs typology of word structure
325
123 Conclusion
334
Morphological change
336
131 Morphological change and synchronic morphology
337
132 The morphologization of phonological rules
339
133 The morphologization of syntactic structures
346
134 Analogy or changes in morphological rules
365
135 Conclusion
372
Morphology as a computational problem
373
142 Approaches to computational morphology
376
143 Some general problems
387
144 Alternatives to existing approaches
393
145 Conclusion
399
References
402
Index
417
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