Lives of eminent and illustrious Englishmen, ed. by G. G. Cunningham, Volume 3

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 316 - And yet, on the other hand, unless wariness be used, as good almost kill a man as kill a good book. Who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image; but he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself, kills the image of God, as it were, in the eye.
Page 316 - I deny not, but that it is of greatest concernment in the Church and Commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors.
Page 188 - AUTHOR'S APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK. WHEN at the first I took my pen in hand, Thus for to write, I did not understand That I at all should make a little book In such a mode : Nay, I had undertook To make another ; which when almost done, Before I was aware, I this begun. And thus it was : I, writing of the way And race of saints in this our gospel-day, Fell suddenly into an allegory About their journey, and the way to glory...
Page 292 - The true genius is a mind of large general powers, accidentally determined to some particular direction.
Page 188 - I show'd them others, that I might see whether They would condemn them, or them justify : And some said, Let them live ; some, Let them die; Some said, John, print it ; others said, Not so ; Some said, It might do good ; others said, No.
Page 268 - O, thou undaunted daughter of desires! By all thy dower of lights and fires, By all the eagle in thee, all the dove, By all thy lives and deaths of love, By thy large draughts of intellectual day, And by thy thirsts of love more large than they; By all thy...
Page 334 - There is no antidote against the opium of time, which temporally considereth all things : our fathers find their graves in our short memories, and sadly tell us how we may be buried in our survivors.
Page 335 - But man is a noble animal, splendid in ashes, and pompous in the grave, solemnizing nativities and deaths with equal lustre, nor omitting ceremonies of bravery in the infamy of his nature.
Page 242 - He affects the metaphysics, not only in his satires, but in his amorous verses, where nature only should reign ; and perplexes the minds of the fair sex with nice speculations of philosophy, when he should engage their hearts, and entertain them with the softnesses of love.
Page 242 - A declaration of that paradox, or thesis, that self-homicide is not so naturally sin, that it may never be otherwise.

Bibliographic information