The Interpretation of the New Testament, 1861-1961

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Oxford University Press, 1966 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 360 pages
Many people who are not theological students know that in the last hundred years the New Testament has been subjected to intense critical study, much of it radical in its conclusions, from the nineteenth-century Lives of Jesus by D.F. Strauss and Ernest Renan, to the work of twentieth-century German 'De-mythologizers' such as R. Bultmann. Where, it may be asked, does the New Testament stand today after all this? What is the educated non-specialist reader to think? Bishop Neill combines great experience of the world-wide Church with a Cambridge theological traning and a notable facility in the main European languages; on the basis of his Firth Lectures at Nottingham University, he has written a masterly survey of the subject showing the historical development of New Testament criticism, the movements of thought, the contrasting personalities of scholars, and the permanent contributions made by various schools, ending with an assessment of the position today. Though the story may seem an academic one and is told with scholarly judgement, Bishop Neill shows the supreme interest for the Church of the results of such scholarship, and the story as he tells it is of absorbing interest.

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Contents

CHALLENGE TO ORTHODOXY I
1
THE NEW TESTAMENT AND HISTORY
33
WHAT THE NEW TESTAMENT SAYS AND WHAT IT MEANS
61
Copyright

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