The Works of Benjamin Disraeli: Henrietta Temple, v. 2. The carrier pigeon. The consul's daughter. Walstein. Ibrahim pasha [and other sketches] The spirit of Whiggism

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subscribers only, 1904
 

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Page 117 - ... mistress. He was anxious to hear what her former way of life had been; and she related, at his request, the circumstances by which she and her parents had been reduced to such distress. His countenance presently showed how much he was interested in her story — he grew red and...
Page 162 - Witt the exception of Constantinople, there is no city in the world that can for a moment enter into competition with it. For himself, though in his time something of a rambler, he is not ashamed in this respect to confess to a legitimate Cockney taste ; and for his part he does not know where life...
Page 79 - The world cannot rob us of that, and if it be better to live than to die, it is better to live in a good humour than a bad one. If a man be convinced that existence is the greatest pleasure, his happiness may be increased by good fortune, but it will be essentially independent of it.
Page 162 - For himself, though in his time something of a rambler, he is not ashamed in this respect to confess to a legitimate Cockney taste; and for his part he does not know where life can flow on more pleasantly than in sight of Kensington Gardens, viewing the silver Thames winding by the bowers of Rosebank, or inhaling from its terraces the refined air of graceful Richmond. "In exactly ten minutes it is in the power of every man to free himself from all the tumult of the world: the pangs of love, the throbs...
Page 76 - laughed Madame ; " I can assure you, my dear Mr. Walstein, that I have a great many very pretty friends who will run the risk. 'Tis the best cure for melancholy, believe me. I was serious myself at times before I married, but you see I have got over my gloom." " You have indeed," said Walstein ; " and perhaps, were I Dr. de Schulembourg, I might be as gay.
Page 35 - The common consequence of being a traveller.' 'Yes — but— in short — I — ' 'You must come,' said Miss Ponsonby, with a glance like sunshine. 'You do with me what you like,' exclaimed Mr. Ferrers, with animation. 'Beautiful — weather,' he concluded. Mr. Ferrers was therefore their guest; and strange it is to say, that from this day, from some cause, which it is now useless to ascertain, this gentleman became an habitual guest at the Consul's table; accepting a general invitation without...
Page 79 - Well, be not alarmed ! He is not now in Dresden. He has been leading a wild life for some time, in our Saxon Switzerland in a state of despair. I am the unhappy nymph who occasions his present desperation," continued Madame de Schulembourg, with a smile. " Do not think me heartless ; all his passion is imagination. Change of scene ever cures him ; he has written to me every week — his letters are each time more reasonable. I have no doubt he has by this time relieved his mind in some mad work which...
Page 113 - It lies upon its back, and in its fall has destroyed all the temple within reach. It measures more than sixty feet round the shoulders, the breadth of the instep is nearly seven feet, and the hieroglyphical figures engraven on the arm are large enough for a man to walk in. Perhaps the most interesting group of ruins at Thebes is the quarter of Medeenet Haboo.
Page 2 - It is fortunate that that great body corporate, styled a nation — a vast assemblage of human beings, knit together by laws and arts and customs — by the necessities of the present and the memory of the past — offers in this country, through these its vigorous and enduring members, a more substantial and healthy frame-work than falls to the lot of other nations. Our stout-built constitution throws off with more facility and safety those crude and dangerous humors which must at times arise in...
Page 56 - They ascended a staircase perfumed with flowers, and on each landingplace was a classic tripod or pedestal crowned with a bust. And then they were ushered into a drawing-room of Parisian elegance ; buhl cabinets, marqueterie tables, hangings of the choicest damask, suspended from burnished cornices of old carving. The chairs had been rifled from a Venetian palace ; the couches were part of the spoils of the French revolution. There were glass screens in golden frames, and a clock that represented...

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