The Book of Black Magic and Ceremonial Magic

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Book Tree, 2006 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 372 pages
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With this book the author has assembled together a number of magical spells and treatises from a variety of obscure sources. The result is a great overview of magic from one of the most important figures in Western occultism. When critical at times of Eliphas Levi and Waite's former associate, S. L. MacGregor Mathers, it shows an attempt at being honest with his views on magic. He also covers many of the original early grimoires, sometimes quoting them, and points out flaws in the more recent translations of his time. This is an expanded, updated version of his previous work, The Book of Black Magic. The book is a gold-mine of smaller magical pamphlets published in France in the nineteenth century, which were reproductions of earlier eighteenth-century works, now preserved in this book and valued for their content. All in all this is not so much a book of rituals to perform, which are plentiful and easy to find. It is instead a great reference book on ritual magic, of which only a few good ones exist today. In this regard, it is considered one of the best.
 

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Contents

assistants
12
Page 223
43
by four nails taken from the coffin of an executed criminal The skull
146
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About the author (2006)

Arthur Edward Waite was born on October 2, 1857 in Brooklyn, New York. He was a poet and scholarly mystic who wrote extensively on occult and esoteric matters, and was the co-creator of the Rider-Waite Tarot deck. Waite joined the Outer Order of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn in January 1891 after being introduced by E.W. Berridge. In 1899 he entered the Second order of the Golden Dawn. He became a Freemason in 1901, and entered the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia in 1902. In 1903 Waite founded the Independent and Rectified Order R. R. et A. C. Waite was a prolific author and many of his works were well received in academic circles. He wrote occult texts on subjects including divination, esotericism, Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry, and ceremonial magic, Kabbalism and alchemy; he also translated and reissued several important mystical and alchemical works. His works on the Holy Grail, influenced by his friendship with Arthur Machen, were particularly notable. A number of his volumes remain in print, including The Book of Ceremonial Magic (1911), The Holy Kabbalah (1929), A New Encyclopedia of Freemasonry (1921), and his edited translation of Eliphas Levi's 1896 Transcendental Magic, its Doctrine and Ritual (1910), having seen reprints in recent years. Waite also wrote two allegorical fantasy novels, Prince Starbeam (1889) and The Quest of the Golden Stairs (1893).

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