How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method

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Princeton University Press, Oct 26, 2014 - Mathematics - 288 pages

A perennial bestseller by eminent mathematician G. Polya, How to Solve It will show anyone in any field how to think straight. In lucid and appealing prose, Polya reveals how the mathematical method of demonstrating a proof or finding an unknown can be of help in attacking any problem that can be "reasoned" out—from building a bridge to winning a game of anagrams. Generations of readers have relished Polya's deft—indeed, brilliant—instructions on stripping away irrelevancies and going straight to the heart of the problem.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gottfried_leibniz - LibraryThing

I came across this book as a result of my entry into Mathematics. If you have read enough Philosophy and question your own assumptions, ideas, you'll find the ideas in this book are repetitive. I ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - andycyca - LibraryThing

[5 out of 5] My only regret is that I must return this book to the library. This is one of those rare books I recommend to pretty much anyone who has to deal with problem solving. Not just ... Read full review

Contents

PART I IN THE CLASSROOM
1
PART II HOW TO SOLVE IT
33
PART III SHORT DICTIONARY OF HEURISTIC
37
PART IV PROBLEMS HINTS SOLUTIONS
233
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About the author (2014)

George Polya (1887–1985) was one of the most influential mathematicians of the twentieth century. His basic research contributions span complex analysis, mathematical physics, probability theory, geometry, and combinatorics. He was a teacher par excellence who maintained a strong interest in pedagogical matters throughout his long career. Even after his retirement from Stanford University in 1953, he continued to lead an active mathematical life. He taught his final course, on combinatorics, at the age of ninety. John H. Conway (1937-2020) was professor emeritus of mathematics at Princeton University. He was awarded the London Mathematical Society's Polya Prize in 1987. He was interested in many branches of mathematics and invented a successor to Polya's notation for crystallographic groups.

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