The Critical Review: Or, Annals of Literature, Volume 6

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Tobias Smollett
R[ichard]. Baldwin, at the Rose in Pater-noster-Row, 1814 - Books
 

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Page 384 - Cold is the heart, fair Greece ! that looks on thee, Nor feels as lovers o'er the dust they loved; Dull is the eye that will not weep to see Thy walls defaced, thy mouldering shrines removed By British hands, which it had best behoved To guard those relics ne'er to be restored.
Page 445 - This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve, By his lov'd mansionry, that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coigne of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed, and procreant cradle : Where they most breed and haunt, I have observ'd, The air is delicate.
Page 309 - Then are they glad, because they are at rest : and so he bringeth them unto the haven where they would be. 0 that men would therefore praise the LORD for his goodness : and declare the wonders that he doeth for the children of men...
Page 128 - Loch Achray — Where shall he find, in foreign land, So lone a lake, so sweet a strand ! — There is no breeze upon the fern, No ripple on the lake...
Page 376 - Cast thy bread upon the waters : for thou shall find it after many days.
Page 406 - Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear : For our God is a consuming fire.
Page 90 - He left the name, at which the world grew pale, To point a moral, or adorn a tale.
Page 583 - Lovelace; but he has excelled his original in the moral effect of the fiction. Lothario, with gaiety which cannot be hated, and bravery which cannot be despised, retains too much of the spectator's kindness.
Page 431 - Angelo, as he thought would be most conducive to his future excellence ; and by his well-directed study acquired, whilst he contemplated the best works of the best masters, that grace of thinking to which he was principally indebted for his subsequent reputation as a portrait painter.
Page 445 - Banquo observing the martlets' nests in every recess of the cornice, remarks, that where those birds most breed and haunt, the air is delicate. The subject of this quiet and easy Conversation gives that repose so necessary to the mind after the tumultuous bustle of the preceding scenes, and perfectly contrasts the scene of horror that immediately succeeds.

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