The Wanderer

Front Cover
Library of Alexandria, 1965 - Arabic fiction - 92 pages
2 Reviews

I met him at the crossroads, a man with but a cloak and a staff, and a veil of pain upon his face. And we greeted one another, and I said to him, “Come to my house and be my guest.”

And he came.

My wife and my children met us at the threshold, and he smiled at them, and they loved his coming.

Then we all sat together at the board and we were happy with the man for there was a silence and a mystery in him.

And after supper we gathered to the fire and I asked him about his wanderings.

He told us many a tale that night and also the next day, but what I now record was born out of the bitterness of his days though he himself was kindly, and these tales are of the dust and patience of his road.

And when he left us after three days we did not feel that a guest had departed but rather that one of us was still out in the garden and had not yet come in.

 

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User Review  - benuathanasia - LibraryThing

I really don't understand the moral of many/most of Gibran's stories and parables, but that doesn't make them any less interesting. And I find the words beautiful and soothing. I can't explain it, I just enjoy it. Read full review

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User Review  - Melissarochell - LibraryThing

A few really good parables amongst a bunch of mediocre ones at best. I'd compare it to Aesop's Fables if Aesop had included all of his crappy ideas along with his good ones. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 14
Section 15
Section 16
Section 17
Section 18
Section 19
Section 20
Section 21

Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 12
Section 13
Section 22
Section 23
Section 24
Section 25
Section 26

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