Nonviolent Action: A Research Guide

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Taylor & Francis, 1997 - Political Science - 720 pages
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An introduction that explains the theories and research used in the study provides a practical guide to this essential bibliography of English-language sources. The first part of the book covers case-study materials divided by region and subdivided by country. Within each country, materials are arranged chronologically and topically. The second major part examines the methods and theory of nonviolent action, principled nonviolence, and several closely related areas in social science, such as conflict analysis and social movements. The book is indexed by author and subject.
 

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Contents

Ghana
11
Zambia
41
The Americas
65
Canada and the United States
91
Movement 17651775
110
Labor
155
Struggle for Desegregation and Civil Rights
191
Other Movements and Conflicts Since 1960
228
Political Protest and Conflict Since 1945
418
Ireland
425
Ireland Northern
431
Italy
439
Poland
447
Studies of Nonviolent Action and Related Fields
491
Methods of Political Noncooperation
528
Pacifism Principle and War
584

Asia and the Pacific
245
India
264
Mohandas K Gandhi 18691948
290
New Zealand Aotearoa
332
Europe
349
Federal Republic of Germany
395
Theory and Research on Conflict Power
595
Political Violence
615
Collective Action
630
Subject Index
655
Author Index
690
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About the author (1997)

Gene Elmer Sharp was born in North Baltimore, Ohio on January 21, 1928. He received a bachelor's degree in social science and a master's degree in sociology from Ohio State University and a doctorate from Oxford University. During the Korean War, rather than declaring himself a conscientious objector, he refused to cooperate with his draft board because he opposed conscription altogether. He was sentenced to two years in prison for draft dodging, but only served nine months. His strategy of peaceful resistance inspired velvet revolutions that toppled dictators on four continents. He created a list of 198 nonviolent weapons of protest and noncooperation to disrupt or even paralyze oppressive authorities including boycotts, mock funerals, hunger strikes, and Lysistratic nonaction. In 1983, he founded the Albert Einstein Institution to promote indigenous regime change that does not invite violent retaliation. He also taught political science at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and was a researcher at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University. His first book, Gandhi Wields the Weapon of Moral Power: Three Case Studies, was published in 1960. He wrote over 30 books including The Politics of Nonviolent Action: A Conceptual Framework for Liberation and Civilian-Based Defense: A Post-Military Weapons System. He died on January 28, 2018 at the age of 90.