Thinking, Fast and Slow

Front Cover
Allen Lane, 2011 - Cognition - 499 pages
Daniel Kahneman, Nobel laureate in Economics for his seminal work in psychology that challenged the rational model of judgment and decision making, is one of our most important thinkers. His ideas have had a profound impact on many fields, but he has never brought them together in one book. Here, he explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. Kahneman exposes the capabilities--and also the faults and biases--of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior. Then he reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives--and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble.--From publisher description.

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User Review  - rynk - LibraryThing

A Nobel economist pulls together decades of research in psychology for a big tome with a simple point. We have two brains, one impulsive and one analytical, but both always at work. Professor Kahneman ... Read full review

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User Review  - Razinha - LibraryThing

You are given the following problem: 1) You have the opportunity to learn some things about decision-making but must filter the 100 or so pages from 500 yourself to determine if any of them are new 2 ... Read full review

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About the author (2011)

DANIEL KAHNEMAN is Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton University and a professor of public affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is the only non-economist to have won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences; it was awarded to him in 2002 for his pioneering work with Amos Tversky on decision-making.

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