Trance on Trial

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Guilford Press, Aug 4, 1989 - Psychology - 338 pages
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Written primarily for clinicians who practice hypnotherapy, Trance on Trial offers a comprehensive, authoritative evaluation of the use of hypnosis in the courts, as well as practical strategies for maximizing the legal rights of clients while minimizing the liabilities of practitioners.
The book's detailed examination of both investigative and therapeutic hypnosis identifies common legal pitfalls and ways to avoid them. Receiving special attention are those actions that can jeopardize the admissibility of a client's testimony. Considered here are the ever-evolving standards of admissibility governing evidence acquired with the aid of hypnosis.
 

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Contents

The Legal Status of Hypnosis An Overview
3
A Clinical Case
19
Jennifer A Case Portrait
21
Investigative Hypnosis
41
The Road to Admissibility
43
The Search for Safeguards
71
The Rise and Fall of Inadmissibility
88
Hypnosis and Memory
119
The Hypnotherapist in Court
181
Direct Examination
183
CrossExamination
206
The Psychotherapists Experience
231
Conclusion
259
Final Comments
261
State Federal and Foreign Law Pertaining to Forensic Hypnosis
267
References and Bibliography
302

Defining Hypnosis
121
The Nature of Memory and of Hypnotically Refreshed Recall
143

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About the author (1989)

Alan W. Scheflin, LL.M. is Professor of Law at Santa Clara University Law School. Author of two previous books with three others currently in preparation, Scheflin has also written a number of articles for professional journals and law reviews. He was invited to give testimony before the United States Congress and the California Senate Committee on the Judiciary, and appeared as an expert witness on mind and behavior control in Federal District Court.
Jerrold Lee Shapiro, Ph.D. is Associate Professor in the Graduate Division of Couseling Psychology and Education at Santa Clara University. Co-Director of OHANA Family Therapy Institute of San Jose and Los Altos, California, he also serves on the Clinical Faculty at Pacific Graduate School of Psychology in Menlo Park. He has authored four other books as well as numerous book chapters and journal articles.

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