Island off the Coast of Asia: Instruments of Statecraft in Australian Foreign Policy

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jul 15, 2018 - Political Science - 248 pages
This book examines Australian foreign policy in multiple dimensions: diplomatic, military, economic, legal and scientific. It shows how the instruments of statecraft have defended domestic concentrations of wealth and power across the 230-year span of modern Australian history. The pursuit of security has meant much more than protection from invasion. It gives priority to economic interests, and to a political order that secures them. This view of security has deep roots in Australia’s geopolitical tradition. Australia began its existence on the winning side of a worldwide confrontation. The book shows that the ‘organizing principle’ of Australian foreign policy is to stay on the winning side of the global contest. Australia has pursued this principle in war and peace, using the full arsenal of diplomacy, law, investment, research, negotiations, military force and espionage. This book uses many decades of secret files to reveal the inner workings of high-level policy.
 

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Contents

1 The Organizing Principle of Australian Foreign Policy
1
2 A SubImperial Reflex
9
3 The Military Instrument
31
4 The Military Instrument
53
5 Vietnam and the Transformation of Australian Life
67
6 The Military Instrument
93
7 The Legal Instrument and Australias Offshore Energy Riches
107
8 The Challenge of the New International Economic Order
133
9 The Economic Instrument 19831999
149
10 Financial Instruments
173
11 Current Policy Priorities
199
Appendix
225
Acknowledgments
229
Index
231
About the Author
239
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About the author (2018)

Clinton Fernandes teaches at the University of New South Wales, Canberra, Australia.

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